Kavnaugh: A Tale

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Feb 5, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 128 pages
0 Reviews
Longfellow's last excursion into prose fiction, Kavanaugh is a village tale that has all the ingredients of a good New England recipe: old and young maids, lotharios, clergymen, tradesmen, a schoolteacher, a magazinist, a taxidermist, three suicides, runaways, travelers, odd characters, good and bad characters. Kavanagh is simply a delightful, charming account of a small world within itself; a tale of the way life used to be. It is a souvenir of the past.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter One
27
Chapter Two
30
Chapter Three
33
Chapter Four
34
Chapter Five
38
Chapter Six
41
Chapter Seven
42
Chapter Eight
44
Chapter Seventeen
66
Chapter Eighteen
71
Chapter Nineteen
76
Chapter Twenty
83
Chapter TwentyOne
91
Chapter TwentyTwo
95
Chapter TwentyThree
96
Chapter TwentyFour
99

Chapter Nine
46
Chapter Ten
49
Chapter Eleven
50
Chapter Twelve
53
Chapter Thirteen
55
Chapter Fourteen
58
Chapter Fifteen
60
Chapter Sixteen
64
Chapter TwentyFive
102
Chapter TwentySix
104
Chapter TwentySeven
107
Chapter TwentyEight
113
Chapter TwentyNine
116
Chapter Thirty
120
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was born in 1807 in Portland, Maine, and he became a professor of modern languages at Harvard. His most famous narrative poems include The Song of Hiawatha, Paul Reveres Ride, "The Village Blacksmith," "The Wreck of the Hesperus." From his friend Nathaniel Hawthorne, Longfellow got a brief outline of a story from which he composed one of his most favorite poems, 'Evangeline'. The original story had Evangeline wandering about New England in search of her bridegroom. One of the first poets to take the landscape and stories of North America as his subjects, Longfellow became immensely popular all over the world, and he was the first American commemorated in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey. He was given honorary degrees at the great universities of Oxford and Cambridge, invited to Windsor by Queen Victoria, and called by request upon the Prince of Wales. He was also chosen a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences and of the Spanish Academy. He died on March 24, 1882.

Bibliographic information