Keep the Aspidistra Flying

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Penguin Books Limited, Oct 26, 2000 - Fiction - 288 pages
3 Reviews
Gordon Comstock loathes dull, middle-class respectability and worship of money. He gives up a 'good job' in advertising to work part-time in a bookshop, giving him more time to write. But he slides instead into a self-induced poverty that destroys his creativity and his spirit. Only Rosemary, ever-faithful Rosemary, has the strength to challenge his commitment to his chosen way of life. Through the character of Gordon Comstock, Orwell reveals his own disaffection with the society he once himself renounced.

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User Review  - bruchu - LibraryThing

On Imperialism and War This is the second in the series of re-publishing of George Orwell essays edited by George Packer. The focus of this collection is to highlight Orwell's more journalistic side ... Read full review

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I don't regret reading it. But, I wouldnt remonded it to anyone. Orwell himself hated this book and only wrote it because he needed the money.
I found the main character extreamly frustrating and
didn't like him, at all. Also the book is quite depressing, and I dont tend to read books because I feel like being depressed.  

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About the author (2000)

Eric Arthur Blair (1903-1950), better known by his pen-name, George Orwell, was born in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. An author and journalist, Orwell was one of the most prominent and influential figures in twentieth-century literature. His unique political allegory Animal Farm was published in 1945, and it was this novel, together with the dystopia of Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), which brought him world-wide fame. His novels and non-fiction include Burmese Days, Down and Out in Paris and London, The Road to Wigan Pier and Homage to Catalonia.

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