Kendo: Elements, Rules, and Philosophy

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University of Hawaii Press, 2003 - Sports & Recreation - 297 pages
6 Reviews

All students of kendo--the formal art and practice of Japanese swordsmanship--will welcome this manual by an advanced practitioner with a deep understanding of the martial art. The work begins with a history of kendo in Japan, followed by a study of basic equipment and its proper care and use and a detailed description of forms and rules--essential aspects of any martial art. Beginners will find this section particularly helpful because of the close attention paid to fundamental techniques of kendo, including the rare two-sword form (nito ryu), largely unknown outside of Japan. Each technique is accompanied by clear, easy-to-follow illustrations. The Nihon Kendo Kata and Shiai and Shinpan rules and regulations are useful references for those learning the Kata and participating in matches. The author, who is also a practicing physician, is attentive throughout to injury prevention and safety--concerns often overlooked in martial arts manuals.

The elements of kendo philosophy, which can mystify even experienced practitioners, are explained in simple terms to aid understanding. The manual concludes with biographies of Japan's most celebrated swordsmen, an extensive glossary of kendo terms, and a history of kendo in Hawaii, where it has been practiced for more than a century and where some of the world's top practitioners can be found.

 

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Contents

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Page vi - Kendo is a way to discipline the human character through the application of the principles of the sword.
Page vi - ... forever pursue the cultivation of oneself. Thus will one be able to love one's country and society, contribute to one's culture, and promote peace and prosperity among all people.

About the author (2003)

Jinichi Tokeshi, M.D., was born and raised in Okinawa, Japan. After completing his medical studies in Hawaii, he opened a private practice in Honolulu and began teaching at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii. He has attained a yondan in kendo and a sandan in iaido.

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