Kenilworth: a romance, Volume 1

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E.T. Scott, 1821 - Great Britain
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User Review  - john257hopper - LibraryThing

This historical novel is based extremely loosely around the events of the Elizabethan Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester's marriage to Amy Robsart, the controversial and tragic ending of which formed ... Read full review

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Page 73 - The dews of summer night did fall, The moon, sweet regent of the sky, Silver'd the walls of Cumnor Hall, And many an oak that grew thereby.
Page 229 - Their discourse was here interrupted by one of the band of pensioners. "I was sent," said he, after looking at them attentively, "to a gentleman who hath no cloak, or a muddy one. You, sir, I think," addressing the younger cavalier^ "are the man; you will please to follow me.
Page 228 - Unbonnetting at the same time, he fixed his eager gaze on the Queen's approach, with a mixture of respectful curiosity, and modest yet ardent admiration, which suited so well with his fine features, that the warders, struck with his rich attire and noble countenance, suffered him to approach the ground over which the Queen was to pass, somewhat closer than was permitted to ordinary spectators.
Page 230 - In a sovereign's need," answered the youth, ''it is each liegeman's duty to be bold." "God's pity! that was well said, my lord," said the Queen, turning to a grave person who sat by her, and answered with a grave inclination of the head, and something of a mumbled assent.
Page 229 - So saying, he walked away, followed by Walter, leaving the others behind, Blount's eyes almost starting from his head with the excess of his astonishment. At length he gave vent to it in an exclamation — " Who the good jere would have thought this !" And shaking his head with a mysterious air, he walked to his own boat, embarked, and returned to Deptford.
Page 227 - The young cavalier we have so often mentioned had probably never yet approached so near the person of his Sovereign, and he pressed forward as far as the line of warders permitted, in order to avail himself of the present opportunity. His companion, on the contrary...
Page 282 - Flying between the cold moon and the earth, Cupid all arm'd ; a certain aim he took At a fair vestal, throned by the west ; And loos'd his love-shaft smartly from his bow, As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts : But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft Quench'd in the chaste beams of the watery moon ; And the imperial votaress passed on, In maiden meditation, fancy-free.
Page 232 - The Queen again blushed, and endeavored to cover, by laughing, a slight degree of not unpleasing surprise and confusion. "Heard you ever the like, my lords? The youth's head is turned with reading romances. I must know something of him that I may send him safe to his friends. What art thou? " "Raleigh is my name, most gracious Queen, the youngest son of a large but honorable family of Devonshire." "Raleigh?" said Elizabeth, after a moment's recollection; " have we not heard of your service in Ireland...
Page 227 - After this, amid a crowd of lords and ladies, yet so disposed around her that she could see and be seen on all sides, came Elizabeth herself, then in the prime of...
Page 282 - At a fair vestal throned by the west ; And loos'd his love-shaft smartly from his bow, As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts ; But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft Quench'd in the chaste beams of the wat'ry moon ; And the imperial vot'ress passed on In maiden meditation, fancy-free. Yet mark'd I where the bolt of Cupid fell : It fell upon a little western flower, Before milk-white, now purple with love's wound, And maidens call it, love-in-idleness.

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