Keramic art of Japan, by G.A. Audsley and J.L. Bowes

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1881
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Page 134 - It is believed that had the Portuguese enjoyed the trade to Japan but twenty years longer, upon the same foot as they did for some time, such riches would have been transported out of this Ophir to Macao, and there would have been such a plenty and flow of gold and silver in that town, as sacred writs mention there was at Jerusalem in the times of Solomon.
Page 80 - But we reply, that the evil of which we complain has ' grown with the growth, and strengthened with the strength,
Page 136 - All persons who propagate the doctrine of the Catholics, or bear this scandalous name, shall be imprisoned in the ombra, or common jail of the town. The whole race of the Portuguese, with their mothers, nurses, and whatever belongs to them, shall be banished to Macao. Whoever presumes to bring a letter from abroad, or to return after he hath been banished, shall die with all his family; also whoever presumes to intercede for him shall be put to death. No nobleman nor any soldier shall be suffered...
Page 136 - No Japanese ship or boat whatever, nor any native of Japan shall presume to go out of the country...
Page 63 - Observe, then, first — the only essential distinction between Decorative and other art is the being fitted for a fixed place; and in that place, related, either in subordination or command, to the effect of other pieces of art.
Page 136 - All persons who return from abroad shall be put to death. Whoever discovers a priest shall have a reward of 400 to 500 shuets of silver, and for every Christian in proportion.
Page 119 - ... blades and other arms) are made here in the utmost perfection, as are also the richest dresses. And after the best fashion, all sorts of toys, puppets moving their heads of themselves, and numberless other things too many to be here mentioned.
Page 95 - Sin's brother, but by him disgraced and banished into an uninhabited island. It is said of him that he could live two or three days under water. He is, as it were, the Neptune of the country, and the protector of fishermen, and seafaring people. They represent him sitting on a rock, with an angling-rod in one hand, or the celebrated fish tai, in the other.
Page 119 - ... arms, are made here in the utmost perfection, as are also the richest dresses and after the best fashion, all sorts of toys, puppets moving their heads of themselves, and numberless other things too many to be here mentioned. In short, there is nothing can be thought of but what may be found at Miako...
Page 45 - The fox, to return his gratitude, appeared to him, after the victory which he obtained over the murderers of his father, in the shape of a lady of incomparable beauty, and so fired his breast with love that he took her to his wife. It was by her he had this son, who was endowed with divine wisdom, and the precious gift of prognosticating and foretelling things to come.

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