Kew Bulletin, Issues 1-24

Front Cover
H.M. Stationery Office, 1887 - Botany
Issue for Jan. 1897 contains List of Kew publications, 1841-1895; Appendix 5, 1907, contains List of Kew publications, 1896-1906.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 2 - ... or less than — ^ . November 14, 1887. (1) On the Fungus causing the onion disease Peronospora Schleideniana. By AE SHIPLEY, BA The onion disease of the Bermudas is caused by a fungus Peronospora Schleideniana, which lives parasitically upon the leaf of the onion plant. The atmospheric conditions which favour the progress of the disease are heavy dews or rains followed by warm, moist, calm •weather, and the absence of direct sunshine and cold winds. In favourable weather the progress of the...
Page 5 - ... coasts of China. They are stemless, perennial plants, throwing out runners, and having only root leaves, which are thick and fleshy, and usually sword or lance shaped, with sheathing bases. They flower from January to May, and the plants grow wild in the jungles. They are easily propagated on most every soil, from the slips which issue in great abundance from the roots, requiring little or no care, and not requiring to be renewed often, if at all. Dr. Buchanan found this plant employed in the...
Page 17 - Mesembryan" themuin acinaciforme, both of which are common in the sandy tracts " of the Colony. They are astringent and sourish in taste on account of " the acidulated alkaline salt with which they seem to be impregnated. " The expressed juice of the succulent leaves taken internally checks " dysentery and acts as a mild diuretic, while it is also, for its antiseptic " property, used as an excellent gargle in malignant sore throat, violent " salivation and aphtha?, or in the form of a lotion in burns...
Page 13 - ... obtained in this manner was worth at least four times more than that of commerce ; that, moreover, it was more easily employed ; that it required less solvent ; that it gave less trouble in tbe copper, and furnished a purer colour.
Page 12 - Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council for Canada, approved by His Excellency the Governor-General, on the 5th November, 1880.
Page 227 - A small 156 quantity of rubber, as I have said, is collected by Chinese agents of the lessees. Up till quite recently there were only 10 or 12 of these agents. They travel from district to district making purchases from Kachins. The price paid is nominally the same as at Mogaung, but as the Kachins possess no standard weights they are usually cheated to the extent of about 70 per cent. This profit on the difference of weight more than pays all the expenses of the agents. In November of last year...
Page 3 - Diseased plants may be treated with a mixture of powdered sulphur and freshly burnt quicklime sprinkled by hand or by bellows ; or they may be washed or sprayed with a weak solution of iron sulphate (green vitriol). In both cases the fungus is destroyed without injury to the onion plant. Further, both these chemical remedies have the additional advantage of being excellent manures.
Page 4 - After this decoction has been 'strained, it " is added to the rubber-milk, in the proportion of one pint to a gallon, " or until, after brisk stirring, the whole of the milk is coagulated. " The masses of rubber floating on the surface are now strained from " the liquid, kneaded into cakes, and placed under heavy weights to " get rid of all watery particles. When perfectly drained and dry, the " rubber cakes are fit for the market, and exported generally in casks.
Page 5 - Dr. Roxburgh describes the plant as common on the jungly salt soils along the coasts, growing under the bushes, and easily propagated on almost every soil, from the slips which issue in great abundance from the roots, requiring little or no care, and not requiring to be renewed often, if at all, as the plant is perennial. The leaves when thus cultivated are from 3 to 4 feet long. Mr. Home makes the following note on this plant at Mauritius — " Several species of Sansevieria are common here in waste...
Page 9 - ... purposes. It is, however, liable to so many fluctuations, and the prices generally are so low, that it has never received serious attention in British colonies, and hence few, if any, plantations have been exclusively devoted in such colonies to the annatto plant. The annatto of commerce is practically a forest product obtained from wild or semi-wild plants, and the supply has only kept pace with the demand. Of late years a slight revival has taken place in the use of annatto, especially in America,...

Bibliographic information