Kidnapped

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The Floating Press, Jan 1, 2009 - Fiction - 354 pages
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Originally written as a boys' adventure novel, Robert Louis Stevenson's Kidnapped has received praise from a range of writers, including Henry James and Jorge Luis Borges. Set around events in eighteenth century Scotland, such as the "Appin Murder" that happened in the wake of the Jacobite Rising, it skillfully and sympathetically portrays the political situation of the time. A sequel, titled Catriona, was published in 1893.
 

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Contents

Across Morven
192
Chapter XVII The Death of the Red Fox
205
Chapter XVIII I Talk with Alan in the Wood of Lettermore
216
Chapter XIX The House of Fear
230
The Rocks
241
The Heugh of Corrynakiegh
256
The Moor
269
Chapter XXIII Clunys Cage
282

Chapter VI What Befell at the Queens Ferry
71
Chapter VII I Go to Sea in the Brig Covenant Of Dysart
80
Chapter VIII The RoundHouse
92
Chapter IX The Man with the Belt of Gold
101
Chapter X The Siege of the RoundHouse
118
Chapter XI The Captain Knuckles Under
130
Chapter XII I Hear of the Red Fox
138
Chapter XIII The Loss of the Brig
153
Chapter XIV The Islet
163
Through the Isle of Mull
178
The Quarrel
297
Chapter XXV In Balquhidder
315
We Pass the Forth
327
Chapter XXVII I Come to Mr Rankeillor
346
Chapter XXVIII I Go in Quest of My Inheritance
360
Chapter XXIX I Come into My Kingdom
372
Chapter XXX GoodBye
385
Endnotes
392
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Novelist, poet, and essayist Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. A sickly child, Stevenson was an invalid for part of his childhood and remained in ill health throughout his life. He began studying engineering at Edinburgh University but soon switched to law. His true inclination, however, was for writing. For several years after completing his studies, Stevenson traveled on the Continent, gathering ideas for his writing. His Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey (1878) describe some of his experiences there. A variety of essays and short stories followed, most of which were published in magazines. It was with the publication of Treasure Island in 1883, however, that Stevenson achieved wide recognition and fame. This was followed by his most successful adventure story, Kidnapped, which appeared in 1886. With stories such as Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Stevenson revived Daniel Defoe's novel of romantic adventure, adding to it psychological analysis. While these stories and others, such as David Balfour and The Master of Ballantrae (1889), are stories of adventure, they are at the same time fine studies of character. The Master of Ballantrae, in particular, is a study of evil character, and this study is taken even further in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). In 1887 Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, went to the United States, first to the health spas of Saranac Lake, New York, and then on to the West Coast. From there they set out for the South Seas in 1889. Except for one trip to Sidney, Australia, Stevenson spent the remainder of his life on the island of Samoa with his devoted wife and stepson. While there he wrote The Wrecker (1892), Island Nights Entertainments (1893), and Catriona (1893), a sequel to Kidnapped. He also worked on St. Ives and The Weir of Hermiston, which many consider to be his masterpiece. He died suddenly of apoplexy, leaving both of these works unfinished. Both were published posthumously; St. Ives was completed by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, and The Weir of Hermiston was published unfinished. Stevenson was buried on Samoa, an island he had come to love very much. Although Stevenson's novels are perhaps more accomplished, his short stories are also vivid and memorable. All show his power of invention, his command of the macabre and the eerie, and the psychological depth of his characterization.

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