Kidnapped 2, Book 2

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RP Books & Audio, Feb 1, 2008 - Fiction - 269 pages
34 Reviews
In this book, Louise Revell examines questions of Roman imperialism and Roman ethnic identity and explores Roman imperialism as a lived experience based around the paradox of similarity and difference. Her case studies of public architecture in several urban settings provides an understanding of the ways in which urbanism, the emperor and religion were part of the daily encounters of the peoples in these communities. Revell applies the ideas of agency and practice in her examination of the structures that held the empire together and how they were implicated within repeated daily activities. Rather than offering a homogenized "ideal type" description of Roman cultural identity, she uses these structures as a way to understand how these encounters differed between communities and within communities, thus producing a more nuanced interpretation of what it was to be Roman. Bringing an innovative approach to the problem of Romanization, Revell breaks from traditional models and cuts across a number of entrenched debates such as arguments about the imposition of Roman culture or resistance to Roman rule.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - eadieburke - LibraryThing

Book Description Spirited, romantic, and full of danger, Kidnapped is Robert Louis Stevenson's classic of high adventure. Beloved by generations, it is the saga of David Balfour, a young heir whose ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - eadieburke - LibraryThing

I love Robert Louis Stevenson's writing and Kidnapped, I believe, is his best book. He gives us the character of David Balfour who you can't help but wish that things would go his way and he would ... Read full review

Contents

THE LORD ADVOCATE CHAPTER I A BEGGAR ON HORSEBACK
THE HIGHLAND WRITER
I GO TO PILRIG
LORD ADVOCATE PRESTONGRANGE
IN THE ADVOCATES HOUSE
UMQUILE THE MASTER OF LOVAT
I MAKE A FAULT IN HONOUR
THE BRAVO
THE MISSING WITNESS
THE MEMORIAL
THE TEED BALL
IN THE HANDS OF THE LADIES
I MOVE IN GOOD SOCIETY
PART IIFATHER AND DAUGHTER CHAPTER XXI THE VOYAGE INTO HOLLAND
HELVOETSLUYS
TRAVELS IN HOLLAND

THE HEATHER ON FIRE
THE REDHEADED
THE WOOD BY SILVERMILLS
ON THE MARCH AGAIN WITH ALAN
GILLANE SANDS
THE BASS
BLACK ANDIES TALE OF TOD LAPRAIK
A COPY OF HEINECCIUS
THE RETURN OF JAMES MORE
MY LOVE LOST
LAIRD OF SHAWS
IN WHICH I AM LEFT ALONE
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Novelist, poet, and essayist Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. A sickly child, Stevenson was an invalid for part of his childhood and remained in ill health throughout his life. He began studying engineering at Edinburgh University but soon switched to law. His true inclination, however, was for writing. For several years after completing his studies, Stevenson traveled on the Continent, gathering ideas for his writing. His Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey (1878) describe some of his experiences there. A variety of essays and short stories followed, most of which were published in magazines. It was with the publication of Treasure Island in 1883, however, that Stevenson achieved wide recognition and fame. This was followed by his most successful adventure story, Kidnapped, which appeared in 1886. With stories such as Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Stevenson revived Daniel Defoe's novel of romantic adventure, adding to it psychological analysis. While these stories and others, such as David Balfour and The Master of Ballantrae (1889), are stories of adventure, they are at the same time fine studies of character. The Master of Ballantrae, in particular, is a study of evil character, and this study is taken even further in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). In 1887 Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, went to the United States, first to the health spas of Saranac Lake, New York, and then on to the West Coast. From there they set out for the South Seas in 1889. Except for one trip to Sidney, Australia, Stevenson spent the remainder of his life on the island of Samoa with his devoted wife and stepson. While there he wrote The Wrecker (1892), Island Nights Entertainments (1893), and Catriona (1893), a sequel to Kidnapped. He also worked on St. Ives and The Weir of Hermiston, which many consider to be his masterpiece. He died suddenly of apoplexy, leaving both of these works unfinished. Both were published posthumously; St. Ives was completed by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, and The Weir of Hermiston was published unfinished. Stevenson was buried on Samoa, an island he had come to love very much. Although Stevenson's novels are perhaps more accomplished, his short stories are also vivid and memorable. All show his power of invention, his command of the macabre and the eerie, and the psychological depth of his characterization.

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