Kierkegaard and the Limits of the Ethical

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Clarendon Press, 1993 - Philosophy - 184 pages
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This book is a discussion of some of Kierkegaard's central ideas, showing their relevance to contemporary debates in epistemology, ethics, and the philosophy of religion. Anthony Rudd's aim is not simply to expound Kierkegaard's ideas but to draw on them creatively in order to illuminate questions about the foundations of morality and the nature of personal identity, as discussed by analytical philosophers such as MacIntyre, Parfit, Williams, and Foot. Rudd seeks a way forward from the sterile conflict between the view that morality and religion are based on objective reasoning and the view that they are merely expressions of subjective emotions. He argues that morality and religion must be understood in terms of the individual's search for a sense of meaning in his or her own life, but emphasizes that this does not imply that values are arbitrary or merely subjective.

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Contents

KNOWLEDGE AND EXISTENCE
27
THE ETHICAL
68
FROM ETHICS TO RELIGION
115
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

A native of New Zealand, ANTHONY RUDD is a technical consultant with DATEV eG, based in Furth, Germany.

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