Kim

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, Mar 22, 2012 - Fiction - 240 pages
3 Reviews
Nobel Prize-winning author Rudyard Kipling set his final and most famous novel in the complex, mystery-shrouded India of the mid-nineteenth century where an exotic landscape teems with natives living under British colonial rule.
Kim, the poor orphaned son of an Irish soldier stationed in Lahore, straddles both worlds. Neither wholly British nor completely Indian, the young boy searches for his identity in the country where he was born; but at the same time, he struggles to create an identity for himself. Cunning and street wise, Kim is mature beyond his thirteen years and learns to move chameleon-like between the two cultures, becoming the disciple of a Tibetan monk while training as a spy for the British secret service.
Far above the average adventure story, Kim will captivate Kipling devotees as well as fans of tales brimming with foreign intrigue and treachery.
 

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User Review  - amydross - LibraryThing

I think the reason so much criticism has been written on this book is because there are many out there who feel as I do -- that this is a delightful, even beloved novel... but we only wish it took a ... Read full review

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User Review  - she_climber - LibraryThing

I've now listened to this book over the past several weeks and I honestly don't know what I think about it. It makes sense this was originally a serial in a magazine and I think it would have been ... Read full review

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About the author (2012)

Nobel Laureate Rudyard Kipling (1865–1936) is best remembered for children's tales such as The Jungle Book as well as his poetry and stories about British soldiers in India, which include "Gunga Din" and The Man Who Would Be King. Kipling was enormously popular at the turn of the 20th century but his reputation declined with the change in attitude toward British imperialism. In recent years Kipling's works have found new acclaim as a vibrant source of literary and cultural history.

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