Kindred

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Headline, Mar 27, 2014 - Fiction - 300 pages
114 Reviews

Kindred is Hugo and Nebula Award winner Octavia E. Butler's 1979 masterpiece. An essential read which explores themes of racial and gender identity with insight and originality, for fans of the Hulu TV adaptation of Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale. 'A shattering work of art' Los Angeles Herald-Examiner

On her twenty-sixth birthday, Dana and her husband are moving into their apartment when she starts to feel dizzy. She falls to her knees, nauseous. Then the world falls away.

She finds herself at the edge of a green wood by a vast river. A child is screaming. Wading into the water, she pulls him to safety, only to find herself face to face with a very old looking rifle, in the hands of the boy's father. She's terrified. The next thing she knows she's back in her apartment, soaking wet. It's the most terrifying experience of her life ... until it happens again.

The longer Dana spends in nineteenth century Maryland - a very dangerous place for a black woman - the more aware she is that her life might be over before it's even begun.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Bodagirl - LibraryThing

To put it simply, I loved it. It started a bit slow, but it's intentional. Butler draws you in to the inner conflict Dana faces of the time-travel paradox and the catch-22 of the American antebellum slave system. The abruptness of the ending was powerful, both horrifying and powerful. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - shaunesay - LibraryThing

"I lost an arm on my last trip home. My left arm." Is that an opening hook or what? Of course you have to keep reading to find out how she lost her arm! This is not a happy book, but it is an ... Read full review

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About the author (2014)

Octavia E. Butler (1947-2006) was the author of numerous ground-breaking novels, including Kindred, Wild Seed, and Parable of the Sower. Recipient of the Locus, Hugo and Nebula awards, she became the first science fiction writer to receive the MacArthur Fellowship 'Genius Grant'.

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