King Edward II: His Life, His Reign, and Its Aftermath, 1284-1330

Front Cover
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, May 8, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 604 pages
0 Reviews
Edward of Caernarfon is best known today for his disastrous military defeat in 1314 at Bannockburn, where his English army was defeated by a vastly inferior Scottish force led by Robert the Bruce, leading to Scottish Independence. This catastrophe was one of many in a disastrous career marked by indolence, vengefulness, vacillation in relationships with France, deranged policies at home, and constitutional wrangling, ultimately brought to an end by a minor insurgency led by his vindictive wife and her paramour, a disaffected baron.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Formative Years 12841307
3
Prophesy and Retrospection
25
Faltering Steps 13071308
55
Civil Strife 13141322
95
Isabella Triumphant 13261330
177
Edward the Penitent Hermit
219
Scotland 12901330
241
Ireland 12951330
283
1
303
Summing Up
333
A Two Accounts of the Deposition of Edward II
343
Scotland in the Fourteenth Century
351
Notes
357
Bibliography
517
Index
567
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

Roy Martin Haines is a life member of Clare Hall, Cambridge University, a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, and the author of numerous works on British history.

Bibliographic information