King Harald's Saga

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Penguin UK, Apr 28, 2005 - History - 192 pages
2 Reviews
This compelling Icelandic history describes the life of King Harald Hardradi, from his battles across Europe and Russia to his final assault on England in 1066, less than three weeks before the invasion of William the Conqueror. It was a battle that led to his death and marked the end of an era in which Europe had been dominated by the threat of Scandinavian forces. Despite England's triumph, it also played a crucial part in fatally weakening the English army immediately prior to the Norman Conquest, changing the course of history. Taken from the Heimskringla - Snorri Sturluson's complete account of Norway from prehistoric times to 1177 - this is a brilliantly human depiction of the turbulent life and savage death of the last great Norse warrior-king.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Jamie638 - LibraryThing

This is the saga of Harald Hardradi (the ruthless), the last viking king of Norway. He led a fascinating life, including a stint as the chief of the Varangian guards in Constantinople where he became ... Read full review

Review: King Harald's Saga

User Review  - CJSilvie - Goodreads

Magnus Magnuson is the king of scandinavian translation, by far my favourite. This book is maybe not the best of sagas in story telling but it is an indispensable for Norwegian and Anglo-saxon history ... Read full review

Contents

Note on the Translation
KING HARALDS SAGA
Genealogical Tables
Glossary of Proper Names
Chronological Table 103066
Maps
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Snorri Sturluson's fame as a historian---his main work is the 16 sagas included in Heimskringla (c.1230), a monumental history of Norway from its beginning until 1177---lies both in his critical approach to sources and in his fine, realistic exposition of event and motivation. A similar combination of scholarly and imaginative talent is seen in The Prose Edda (c.1220). Intended to be a handbook in skaldic poetry, it preserves invaluable mythological tales that were on the verge of being forgotten even in Sturluson's time. A large part of what we know about Nordic mythology stems from his Edda. The bibliography that follows also lists the anonymous Egil's Saga (1200--30), which many expert Scandinavian medievalists (e.g., Sigurdur Nordal and Bjorn M. Olsen) attribute to Sturluson. It is a fascinating account of life in Norway, England, and Iceland and of the poet-warrior Egil, whose skaldic verse is renowned for its unusual emotional and personal qualities. Snorri Sturluson's own life was as eventful as those about whom he wrote. Returning to Iceland from exile in 1239, he again became deeply involved in serious power struggles and was murdered in 1241.

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