The King of Limbo: Stories

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2002 - Fiction - 221 pages
1 Review
In stories that move deftly from the magical to the mundane, the simple to the surreal, The King of Limbo showcases a mature talent that calls to mind such greats as Alice Munro and Andre Dubus. Here are drifters, waitresses, horse trainers, housewives, a Nigerian foreign exchange student, a fisherman's wife, a cat with a cause. Blending magical realism and a pitch-perfect ear for the expressions of the human heart, Adrianne Harun presents a cast of unforgettable characters caught in limbo between their reality and their dreams.
Set in locales as diverse as a fictional town on the Northwest coast and a Connecticut boarding school, these stories chart physical and emotional landscapes with equal precision and grace. Vacationers dawdle in souvenir shops. Locals quietly observe the superstitions of the sea. A woman, overcome by the loss of a child, runs her car into a Victorian house, only to be adopted by the house's elderly residents. A killer on the loose prompts a newlywed couple to employ a mannequin as a decoy for marital bliss.
Again and again Adrianne Harun displays a unique ability to view the world from a dazzling array of perspectives. The King of Limbo confirms the arrival of a writer to watch.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - SeriousGrace - LibraryThing

"Lukudi" Natife is from Nigeria and knows the ways of lukudi, otherwise known as "wealthmagic" or black magic. Ever since Natife cured Carena's skin ailment she knew he would be the perfect peer ... Read full review

Contents

LUKUDI
13
ACCIDENTS
33
THE UNSEEN EAR OF
55
THE EIGHTH SLEEPER OF EPHESUS
61
ACQUIESCENCE
93
THE KING OF LIMBO
107
THE HIGHWAYMAN
125
A CLOSED
153
HEARTSICK
177
THE FISHERMANS WIFE
199
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Adrianne Harun's stories have appeared in numerous journals, including Story, where Harun won first place in the annual short-short competition. She has received a Nelson Algren Award from the Chicago Tribune and a MacDowell fellowship. Harun lives in Port Townsend, Washington.

Bibliographic information