Kingship and Favoritism in the Spain of Philip III, 1598-1621

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 30, 2006 - History - 320 pages
The enthronement of Philip III of Spain (Philip II's son and heir) in 1598 also meant the rise to power of the duke of Lerma, the first of a series of European favourites/prime ministers who influenced greatly politics, government, court culture and the arts during the seventeenth century. This 2000 book analyses the contexts that explain the rise of Lerma, as well as discourses on kingship and favouritism, and governmental and institutional initiatives taken during Philip III's reign (1598-1621) - a key historical period for our understanding of early modern Spain. Although this book focuses on the reign of Philip III, it also addresses broader historiographical matters. How was power exercised in personal monarchies? What discourses were used to justify royal power? How was kingship publicly represented? How was favouritism conceptualized and legitimized? Was the effect of the rise of the favourite/prime minister upon the constitution of personal monarchies and on the political and ideological struggles?
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The rising stars
9
Introduction
11
The education of a king
15
The making of a favorite
32
Continuity or reform?
48
The kings valido
65
Introduction
67
We need miracles
143
A corrupt regime?
163
The regimes answer peace and Catholicism
189
Reversal of fortune
207
Introduction
209
Ideological confrontation and factional division
213
Fall from power
230
In search of culprits
247

The power of the king
71
In his image and likeness
91
The kings chief minister
110
Monarchy in action
135
Introduction
137
The end of the privado
262
Bibliography
271
Index
293
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