Klinik der Gelenkkrankheiten mit Einschluss der Orthopädie, Volume 3

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Page 21 - The same trunks of nerves whose branches mpply the groups of muscles moving a joint furnish also a distribution of nerves to the skin over the insertions of the same muscles ; and — what at this moment more especially merits our attention — the interior of the joint receives its nerves from the same source.
Page 60 - a spiral manner, just as an ordinary bandage ; after every second or third turn of the bandage, the left hand of the surgeon should be plunged into water, and smeared over the part last applied. When the whole has been thus treated, the exterior of the bandage should be smeared over with a paste of gypsum and water until a smooth surface and complete rigidity have been attained — a process not occupying more than ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.
Page 68 - Remarks on that Kind of Palsy of the Lower Limbs, which is Frequently Found to Accompany a Curvature of the Spine and is Supposed to be Caused by it.
Page 27 - In some few instances the case is much more severe ; the cartilages become involved, and permanent rigidity may be the result. The immediate cause of this affection is still a matter of dispute. By some it has been considered to be connected with the gouty habit ; * whilst Mr.
Page 21 - The irritated or inflamed condition of the interior of the joint (say the knee-joint), involving the whole of the articular nerves, excites a corresponding condition of irritation in the same trunks which supply both sets of muscles, extensors and flexors ; 1 International Encyclopaedia of Surgery, vol.
Page 218 - ... becomes inflamed, the formation of abscesses, attended with a high degree of fever, and ultimately a stiffness of the joints, are the common consequence, if the life of the patient is preserved...
Page 25 - ... hysteric fit. Not 4 per cent, have had any acute affection of the heart; when it came it was of a milder character, and was generally to be accounted for by some imprudent exposure. That is to say, that bedding in blankets reduces from 16 to 4, or by a good three-quarters, the...
Page 55 - ... the risk to life is greater than in the subcutaneous ; while, on the other hand, in the subcutaneous operation there is increased difficulty, and consequently less chance of success. On account of the difficulty which is experienced in getting the cartilage out of the joint into the cellular tissue without an undesirable amount of manipulation, Mr. Syme recommends another method, by which, he says, he generally succeeds without risk. This consists in ' making a free subcutaneous incision through...
Page 124 - WILLIAM ADAMS, FRCS ON THE PATHOLOGY AND ''TREATMENT OF LATERAL AND OTHER FORMS OF CURVATURE OF THE SPINE.
Page 21 - ... involving the whole of the articular nerves, excites a corresponding condition of irritation in the same nervous trunks which supply both sets of muscles, extensors and flexors ; but that the flexors, by virtue of their superior strength, compel the limb to obey them, and so force the joint into its flexed condition. The joint then becomes rigid and flexed, because the same nerves which supply the interior of the joint supply the muscles also which move the joint. This anatomical arrangement,...

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