Knack Baby Sign Language: A Step-by-Step Guide to Communicating with Your Little One

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Rowman & Littlefield, Dec 28, 2009 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 256 pages
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Few children can communicate effectively before eighteen months of age, but sign language can allow baby and parent to reduce the frustration up to a year earlier. With more than 450 full-color photos, text, and sidebars, Knack Baby Sign Language provides a user-friendly, efficient method to learn and teach a baby sign language. Organized by age, it provides signs appropriate to use with babies, with toddlers, and with older children for whom signing with games, songs, and rhymes is enriching. The signs can also be used with special needs children and those with delayed communication abilities.

 

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Contents

Chapter 2 Baby Basics
12
Chapter 3 Babys World
24
Chapter 4 Busy Baby
36
Chapter 5 Babys Learning More
48
Chapter 6 A Full Day
60
Chapter 7 Growing Learning
72
Chapter 8 Loving Life
84
Chapter 9 Fun Celebrations
96
Chapter 13 Exploration Play
144
Chapter 14 Growing Up
156
Chapter 15 Holidays
168
Chapter 16 Signs for All Ages
180
Chapter 17 Lets Eat
192
Chapter 18 Letters
204
Chapter 19 Numbers
212
Chapter 20 Resources
220

Chapter 10 Outside In
108
Chapter 11 Colors Places
120
Chapter 12 Fantastic Fun
132
Index
228
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Suzie Chafin was born hearing to two profoundly deaf parents, Margie and John Coggins-Peckham who met at Galludet University, a hearing impaired college for the deaf in Washington, D.C. Truly bi-lingual and bi-cultural, Suzie understands the Deaf community and culture as one who actively lived and breathed this world. Translating from an early age, American Sign Language was Suzie's first language giving her a breadth of understanding of this complex language and community.

Photographer John Grindstaff is former chair of the art department at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC and currently a professor of photography at this renowned university for the deaf. He regularly exhibits his woork at galleries in Washington, DC. As a student he completed an internship with renowned portrait photographer Annie Liebovitz.

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