Know and Understand Centrifugal Pumps

Front Cover
L. Bachus, A Custodio
Elsevier, Jul 25, 2003 - Technology & Engineering - 264 pages
1 Review
Pumps are commonly encountered in industry and are essential to the smooth running of many industrial complexes. Mechanical engineers entering industry often have little practical experience of pumps and their problems, and need to build up an understanding of the design, operation and appropriate use of pumps, plus how to diagnose faults and put them right. This book tackles all these aspects in a readable manner, drawing on the authors' long experience of lecturing and writing on centrifugal pumps for industrial audiences.
 

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this is very good book for the studnet who is studying in the engineering, and working in the industry, so myself i have understand the how pumps working principle and how pumps sucing the volume and discharging the liquid.

Contents

NPSH Net Positive Suction Head
12
Cavitation
25
Cavitation review
37
Calculating pump efficiency
50
Canned motor pumps
63
Understanding Pump Curves
76
The System Curve
92
Shaft Deflection
128
Bearings
155
Pump Shaft Packing
171
Mechanical Seals
180
Failure Analysis of Mechanical Seals
202
Common Sense Failure Analysis
226
Avoiding Wear in Centrifugal Pumps
232
Pump Piping
238
Index
248

Pump and Motor Alignment
142

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - ... 32.17 ft-lb/lbf-s2 Static Suction Head. This is the difference in elevation, in feet, between the centerline (or impeller eye) of the pump and the liquid surface in the suction vessel. The liquid surface is above the pump centerline. In Fig. 2-10, Z\ is the static suction head. Static Suction Lift. When the liquid level in the suction vessel is below the centerline (or impeller eye) of the pump, the difference in elevation, in feet, between the liquid surface of the suction vessel and the centerline...
Page 4 - Atmospheric pressure is the force exerted by the weight of the atmosphere on a unit area.

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