Knowing where to Draw the Line: Ethical and Legal Standards for Best Classroom Practice

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2006 - Education - 150 pages
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Many teachers in public schools find themselves increasingly unsure of what the law expects of them in the classroom. The general public and government regulators are holding them to higher and stricter standers of conduct, but their educational preparation has not kept up with the changing environment. "Knowing Where to Draw the Line: Ethical and Legal Standards for Best Classroom Practice" is an ideal guide for teacher education programs, offering a comprehensive account of the legal information that will arm teachers for legal survival in the classroom.

Organized for both easy reference and thorough examination, "Knowing Where to Draw the Line: Ethical and Legal Standards for Best Classroom Practice" instructs teachers on how to deal with students, parents, administrators, and local communities, covering an exhaustive list of legal issues including: Sexual harassment, Discipline, Contract negotiations, Liability, and Medical Concerns. In addition, "Knowing Where to Draw the Line: Ethical and Legal Standards for Best Classroom Practice" highlights a number of court cases and uses hypothetical cases to further aid teachers in understanding these vital concerns.

 

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Contents

Chapter 2 Drawing the Line with Students
21
Chapter 3 Drawing the Line with Parents
51
Chapter 4 Drawing the Line with the School Administration
75
Chapter 5 Drawing the Line with the Community
105
Ethic Codes of Educators
119
Notes
133
Index
141
About the Author and Contributors
149
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Mary Ann Manos is Associate Professor in Teacher Education at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois. She is a 30-year veteran of the classroom and a 2000 National Board for Professional Teaching Standards certified teacher in Early Adolescent English/Language Arts. She has taught elementary school through to the college level in both public and private settings. Her work at the university level includes teaching middle school methods and education foundation courses, as well as gifted education. She served for four years as the Director of the Bradley University Institute for Gifted and Talented Youth. Dr. Manos also works with the International Study Abroad programs at Bradley.

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