Knowledge for Inclusive Development

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Pedro Conceição
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2002 - Business & Economics - 487 pages
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The essays in this book examine the role of education and the university in economic development. It is the contention of the contributors that knowledge-ideas and skilled and educated people-are increasingly important for economic development. How to promote inclusive development-the process of development that includes every citizen in any country-has become a wide-ranging puzzle.

After framing the problems associated with globally integrated learning processes from the perspective of science and technology policies, the essayists look at the role of the university in the knowledge economy drawing examples from the United States, Japan, and Portugal. They then review the role of innovation in the industrial policies of a variety of countries, look at systems of knowledge creation and diffusion, and conclude with commentary on the roles of public planning and policy in the achievement of sustainable development. This wide-ranging examination of knowledge and development issues will be of value to scholars, researchers, and policy makers involved with economic growth and development.

 

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Contents

THE UNIVERSITY IN THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY
29
KNOWLEDGE INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
111
SYSTEMS OF KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND DIFFUSION
259
TOOLS AND POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
381
Index
477
About the Contributors
481
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Page 13 - Stiglitz (1999) notes that legislation and even enforcement alone are not enough: "the social and organizational capital needed for the transition cannot be legislated, decreed, or in some other way imposed from above. People need to take an active and constructive role in their self-transformation; to a large extent, they need to be in the driver's seat.
Page 12 - Social capital is defined by its function. It is not a single entity but a variety of different entities, with two elements in common: they all consist of some aspect of social structures, and they facilitate certain actions of actors - whether persons or corporate actors - within the structure.

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About the author (2002)

PEDRO CONCEIC O is with Portugal's Instituto Superior Tecnico and the IC2 Institute of the University of Texas, Austin.

DAVID V. GIBSON is with the IC2 Institute of the University of Texas, Austin.

MANUEL V. HEITOR is with the Instituto Superior Technico in Portugual.

GIORGIO SIRILLI is Research Director, Institute for Studies on Scientific Research and Documentation, National Research Council of Italy, and Professor of Economics, Tor Vergata University, Rome.

FRANCISCO VELOSO is with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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