Knowledge of the Higher Worlds and Its Attainment

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SteinerBooks, 1946 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 288 pages
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This is one of the most popular classic translations of Steiner's foundational guide to the spiritual path. Knowledge of the Higher Worlds and Its Attainment is a manual for attaining suprasensory knowledge of the invisible and opens new perspectives on one's essential purpose in life.
In 1904, Rudolf Steiner first made this account of the Western esoteric path of initiation public. With great precision, he carefully leads us from the cultivation of the fundamental soul attitudes of reverence and inner tranquility to inner development through the stages of preparation, illumination, and initiation. Practical exercises in inner and outer observation and moral development are given. By patiently and persistently following these, new organs of soul and spirit begin to form that reveal the contours of the higher worlds hitherto concealed from us.
"The methods by which a student is prepared for the reception of higher knowledge are minutely prescribed. The direction he is to take is traced with unfading, everlasting letters in the worlds of the spirit where the initiates guard the higher secrets. In ancient times, anterior to our history, the temples of the spirit were also outwardly visible; today, because our life has become so unspiritual, they are not to be found in the world visible to external sight; yet they are present spiritually everywhere, and all who seek may find them."
Contents:
  • How is Knowledge of the Higher Worlds Attained?
  • The Stages of Initiation: Enlightenment; Preparation; The Control of Thoughts and Feelings
  • Initiation
  • Some Practical Aspects
  • The Conditions of Esoteric Training
  • Some Results of Initiation
  • The Transformation of Dream Life
  • The Continuity of Consciousness
  • The Splitting of the Human Personality during Spiritual Training
  • The Guardian of the Threshold
  • Life and Death: The Greater Guardian of the Threshold
  • Appendix

"Not everyone can immediately achieve spiritual vision; but the discoveries of those who have it can be health-giving life nourishment for all. The results of supersensible knowledge, when properly employed in life, prove to be not impractical, but rather, practical in the highest sense....
"The acquisition of higher knowledge is not the end, but the means to an end; the end consists in the attainment, thanks to this knowledge, of greater and truer self-confidence, a higher degree of courage, and a magnanimity and perseverance such as cannot, as a rule, be acquired in the lower world....
"The student places all the higher knowledge he has acquired at the service of humanity." --Rudolf Steiner

 

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living with it since many years and still new agin everytime I pick it up.

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My full review of this book is at: http://www.doyletics.com/_arj1/knowledg.htm
Bobby Matherne

Contents

How Is Knowledge of the Higher
1
The Stages of Initiation
35
Initiation
78
Some Practical Aspects
98
The Conditions
114
Some Results of Initiation
131
The Transformation of Dream Life
189
The Continuity of Consciousness
202
The Guardian of the Threshold
231
Life and Death The Greater Guard
245
Appendix
260
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About the author (1946)

Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.

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