Korean Reader for Chinese Characters

Front Cover
University of Hawaii Press, 2002 - Foreign Language Study - 362 pages
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Korean Reader for Chinese Characters will help students of Korean master basic Chinese characters that are frequently encountered in everyday situations. More than five hundred characters are targeted in exercises that aid in the efficient study of the forms, meanings, and sounds of individual characters and their compounds. Although the primary goal of the Reader is recognition of basic Chinese characters, students are encouraged to learn to write them properly by inclusion of a section on stroke order. The Reader is also designed to reinforce skills in reading and writing in Korean while studying Chinese characters.

Forty lessons are preceded by an introductory chapter on the principles of Chinese character formation and reading and writing characters and followed by appendices on stroke order, English translations of the main reading text of each lesson, and an index of characters. The lessons are organized into seven parts: new characters, reading text, glossary, notes, new words in characters, more words in characters, and exercises. After every fifth lesson, there is a section reviewing all the characters introduced in the preceding five lessons.

 

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Contents

I
vi
II
xv
III
xvii
IV
1
V
8
VI
15
VII
22
VIII
28
XXVIII
159
XXIX
166
XXX
174
XXXI
181
XXXII
188
XXXIII
192
XXXIV
199
XXXV
206

IX
34
X
40
XI
47
XII
53
XIII
60
XIV
66
XV
72
XVI
76
XVII
84
XVIII
91
XIX
98
XX
104
XXI
111
XXII
114
XXIII
121
XXIV
128
XXV
135
XXVI
142
XXVII
152
XXXVI
212
XXXVII
218
XXXVIII
224
XXXIX
227
XL
234
XLI
241
XLII
247
XLIII
254
XLIV
266
XLV
273
XLVI
280
XLVII
288
XLVIII
295
XLIX
302
L
306
LI
326
LII
360
Copyright

Popular passages

Page vi - Sino-Korean words.) Before the nineteenth century when Western cultures began to permeate East Asia, China had long been the center of East Asian civilization.
Page vii - Foundation and the University of Hawai'i Press (notably Patricia Crosby, Ann Ludeman, and Nancy Woodington) for making this valuable book appear in the world.
Page vi - Thus, the Chinese script has long been an integral part of the Korean writing system.

About the author (2002)

Heisoon Yang is professor of English linguistics and language pedagogy at Ewha Womans University.

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