Kwyl in Postcolonial Saint Lucia: Globalization, Language Planning, and National Development

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John Benjamins Publishing, 2011 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 316 pages
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Can historically marginalized, threatened languages be saved in the contemporary global era? In relation to the wider postcolonial world, especially the Caribbean, this book focuses on efforts to preserve and promote Lesser Antillean French Creole Kwyl as the national language of Saint Lucia and on the legacy of colonialism and impact of globalization, with which English has become the universal lingua franca, as mitigating factors undermining these efforts. It deals specifically with language planning for democratization and government; literacy, the schools and higher education; and the mass media. It also examines changes in the status of and attitudes toward Kwyl, English and French since national independence and presents language planning implications from these changes and steps already undertaken to elevate Kwyl. The book offers new insight into globalization and its impact on linguistic pluralism, language planning, national development, Creole languages, and cultural identity in the Caribbean.
 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 Colonial background
35
3 Kwyl cultural nationalism
59
4 An Anglophone country in an Englishspeaking world
83
5 The Francophonie and Crolophonie
101
6 Government and democracy
121
7 Literacy the schools and higher education
141
8 The mass media
169
9 The changing status of Kwyl
193
10 The enduring attraction and assimilative power of English
211
11 The role of French in the nation
231
12 Conclusions and language planning implications
251
References
283
Index
305
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