LECTURES ON MENTAL AND MORAL CULTURE.

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Page 318 - Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No : — men, high-minded men, With powers as far above dull brutes endued In forest, brake, or den, As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude, — Men who their duties know, But know their rights, and, knowing, dare maintain, Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain ; These constitute a State ; And sovereign law, that State's collected will, O'er thrones and globes elate Sits empress, crowning good, repressing...
Page 150 - I am no orator, as Brutus is, But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man That love my friend, and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him. For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech To stir men's blood.
Page 318 - What Constitutes a State? WHAT constitutes a State ? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate — Not cities proud with spires and turrets crowned — Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride — Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No; men, high-minded men...
Page 279 - For, lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone. The flowers appear on the earth ; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land. The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, and the vines with the tender grape give a good smell. Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
Page 273 - Yet he was kind, or, if severe in aught, The love he bore to learning was in fault. The village all declared how much he knew: 'Twas certain he could write, and cipher, too; Lands he could measure, terms and tides presage, And e'en the story ran — that he could gauge.
Page 145 - ... any man, that is, any good man, that had such a mother, would have done exactly the same. I know you are only joking with me; but indeed, madam, though I...
Page 108 - Webster entered upon his argument in the calm tone of easy and dignified conversation. His matter was so completely at his command that he scarcely looked at his brief, but went on for more than four hours with a statement so luminous, and a chain of reasoning so easy to be understood, and yet approaching so nearly to absolute demonstration, that he seemed to carry with him every man of his audience without the slightest effort or weariness on either side.
Page 111 - Sir, I know not how others may feel (glancing at the opponents of the college before him), but for myself, when I see my alma mater surrounded like Caesar in the Senate House, by those who are reiterating stab upon stab, I would not for this right hand, have her turn to me, and say, et tu quoque, mi fill ! and thou, too, my son ! — He sat down.
Page 279 - And unto him that smiteth thee on the one cheek offer also the other ; and him that taketh away thy cloak forbid not to take thy coat also.
Page 109 - Sir, you may destroy this little institution ; it is weak; it is in your hands ! I know it is one of the lesser lights in the literary horizon of our country. You may put it out. But, if you do so, you must carry through your work! You must extinguish, one after another, all those greater lights of science which, for more than a century, have thrown their radiance over our land!

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