La Odisea

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Ediciones Rialp, Jan 2, 2001 - Mythology, Greek - 194 pages
19 Reviews
A retelling of Homer's epic that describes the wanderings of Odysseus after the fall of Troy.
 

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Lo leí cuando era muy chico, y me quedaron muy buenos recuerdos :)

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
4
Section 3
7
Section 4
11
Section 5
14
Section 6
19
Section 7
23
Section 8
33
Section 19
102
Section 20
106
Section 21
110
Section 22
113
Section 23
118
Section 24
124
Section 25
130
Section 26
135

Section 9
42
Section 10
46
Section 11
54
Section 12
56
Section 13
61
Section 14
68
Section 15
77
Section 16
83
Section 17
86
Section 18
92
Section 27
141
Section 28
148
Section 29
151
Section 30
153
Section 31
163
Section 32
168
Section 33
181
Section 34
183
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Homer is the author of The Iliad and The Odyssey, the two greatest Greek epic poems. Nothing is known about Homer personally; it is not even known for certain whether there is only one true author of these two works. Homer is thought to have been an Ionian from the 9th or 8th century B.C. While historians argue over the man, his impact on literature, history, and philosophy is so significant as to be almost immeasurable. The Iliad relates the tale of the Trojan War, about the war between Greece and Troy, brought about by the kidnapping of the beautiful Greek princess, Helen, by Paris. It tells of the exploits of such legendary figures as Achilles, Ajax, and Odysseus. The Odyssey recounts the subsequent return of the Greek hero Odysseus after the defeat of the Trojans. On his return trip, Odysseus braves such terrors as the Cyclops, a one-eyed monster; the Sirens, beautiful temptresses; and Scylla and Charybdis, a deadly rock and whirlpool. Waiting for him at home is his wife who has remained faithful during his years in the war. Both the Iliad and the Odyssey have had numerous adaptations, including several film versions of each.

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