La empresa en la sociedad que viene: los seis factores que están transformando al mundo que conocemos

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Empresa Activa, 2003 - Business & Economics - 240 pages
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Analyzes dynamic trends in the new century's information-driven society including the "Global Baby Bust," "New Work Force," and "Knowledge Worker" to consider how managers can prepare for unexpected consequences. By the author of The Effective Executive. (Business & Finance)

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Contents

Prefacio
9
La sociedad de la información
13
Más allá de la Revolución de la Información
15
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

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About the author (2003)

Rick Wartzman is executive director of the Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University. By advancing the teachings of the late Peter F. Drucker, the Institute seeks to stimulate effective management and ethical leadership across all sectors of society. Wartzman is also a columnist for BusinessWeek online.

His most recent book, "Obscene in the Extreme: The Burning and Banning of John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath", was published by PublicAffairs in September 2008. It was picked as a Borders "Original Voices" selection and named by the Los Angeles Times as one of its 25 favorite nonfiction books of the year. It was also a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in history. Wartzman is the co-author, with Mark Arax, of the best-seller "The King of California: J.G. Boswell and the Making of a Secret American Empire", which was selected as one of the 10 best books of 2003 by the San Francisco Chronicle and one of the 10 best nonfiction books of the year by the Los Angeles Times. It also won, among other honors, a California Book Award and the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing.

Before joining the Drucker Institute, Wartzman spent two decades as a newspaper reporter, editor and columnist. He began his career at "The Wall Street Journal", where he served in a variety of positions, including White House correspondent and founding editor of the paper's weekly California section. He joined the "Los Angeles Times" in 2002 as business editor and, in that role, helped shape "The Wal-Mart Effect," which won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting. Wartzman later became editor of the newspaper's Sunday magazine, West, which under his leadership was named by the Missouri School of Journalism as the best newspaper supplement in America. Until recently, Wartzman was an Irvine senior fellow at the New America Foundation, a nonpartisan public policy think tank.

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