Lady Audley's Secret

Front Cover
Barnes & Noble Publishing, 2005 - Bigamy - 441 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
24
3 stars
8
2 stars
1
1 star
1

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - amerynth - LibraryThing

Both of my book sites recommended I read Mary Elizabeth Braddon's "Lady Audley's Secret" -- and I can totally see why. Victorian mystery literature, billed as being in the vein of Wilkie Collins ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - etxgardener - LibraryThing

Yikes! What a book! Who said the Victorians led prim and proper lives? This romance/thriller has everything: bigamy, attempted murder, arson,theft and madness. What's not to like? The novel opens with ... Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
13
IV
24
V
32
VI
38
VII
45
VIII
51
IX
63
XXIII
185
XXIV
199
XXV
208
XXVI
216
XXVII
232
XXVIII
245
XXIX
258
XXX
268

X
75
XI
83
XII
88
XIII
94
XIV
100
XV
108
XVI
116
XVII
127
XVIII
136
XIX
143
XX
150
XXI
163
XXII
172
XXXI
286
XXXII
298
XXXIII
313
XXXIV
332
XXXV
348
XXXVI
364
XXXVII
377
XXXVIII
386
XXXIX
398
XL
428
XLI
438
XLII
441
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Mary Elizabeth Braddon, the daughter of a solicitor, was educated privately. As a young woman, she acted under an assumed name for three years in order to support herself and her mother. In 1860 she met John Maxwell, a publisher of periodicals, whose wife was in an asylum for the insane. Braddon acted as stepmother to Maxwell's five children and bore him five illegitimate children before the couple married, in 1874, when Maxwell's wife died. Braddon's most famous novel, Lady Audley's Secret (1862), was first published serially in Robin Goodfellow and The Sixpenny Magazine. One of the earliest sensationalist novels, it sold nearly one million copies during Braddon's lifetime. Its plot involves bigamy, the protagonist's desertion of her child, her murder of her first husband, and her thoughts of poisoning her second husband. The novel shocked and outraged her contemporary, Margaret Oliphant, who said Braddon had invented "the fair-haired demon of modern fiction." Throughout her long literary career, during which she wrote more than 80 novels and edited several magazines, Braddon was often excoriated for her penchant for sensationalizing violence, crime, and sexual indiscretion. Nevertheless, Braddon had many well-known devotees, among them William Makepeace Thackeray, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, and Robert Louis Stevenson. Braddon died in 1915.

Bibliographic information