Lament, Death, and Destiny

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Peter Lang, 2004 - Foreign Language Study - 179 pages
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Lament, a natural, healthy response to unfair suffering and death, has largely disappeared from modern life and thought. This book reaffirms ancient Greek and Hebrew conceptions of lament as a protest against death as fate. Richard A. Hughes finds lament to be basic in the Bible, and he traces the decline of lament, beginning with Plato's antifeminist critique and early Christian theodicy, through the church fathers and the Protestant reformers. He shows that lament was displaced by classical doctrines of providence but recaptured in the modern existentialist revolt against unjust suffering. Hughes discusses the need for lament in the present age of mass, catastrophic death.
 

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Contents

Lament Death and Fate
11
The Complaint Against God
27
The Complaint of the Community
41
The Rejection of Abandonment
57
Early Christian Burial Rites
70
Christian Consolation Theologies
73
Rejections of Fate in the Eastern Church
86
Decline of Lament in the Reformation
101
The Existentialist Revolt
119
Freedom and Destiny
133
Summary
147
Attitudes Toward Pain
162
Index
177
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About the author (2004)

The Author: Richard A. Hughes is the M.B. Rich Professor of Religion at Lycoming College in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. He received his Ph.D. in systematic theology at Boston University and studied in Geneva, Paris, and Tokyo. He has published seven books and many essays in the areas of ethics, depth psychology, and theology. His Return of the Ancestor (Peter Lang, 1992) won the Szondi Prize of Switzerland.

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