Landscape-gardening

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Univ of Massachusetts Press, 1920 - Architecture - 338 pages
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Ossian Cole Simonds (1855-1931) was one of the country's earliest and most important landscape architects, the progenitor of the "middle-western movement" of landscape design. He laid out college campuses, arboreta, estates, parks, and the much admired Graceland Cemetery in Chicago. He was also an influential teacher, author, and founder of university programs in landscape architecture, and the only midwesterner among the eleven charter members of the American Society of Landscape Architects.

First published in 1920, Landscape-Gardening presents Simonds's carefully conceived and still timely ideas about an approach to landscape design in which nature is both partner and model. In eighteen well-illustrated chapters, he addresses the design of many different types of landscapes--from residences to parks to school grounds--and recommends an approach based on respect for natural systems and acceptance of stewardship responsibility.

Many of Simonds's ideas were remarkably prescient. He encouraged the use of native plants; he called for the protection of land for aesthetic as well as utilitarian reasons; he championed interconnected park and boulevard systems or "greenways"; he encouraged the planting of "nature gardens"; and he proposed thoughtful solutions to the increasingly ragged edges of early twentieth-century cities, warning of sprawl long before the word was invented.

Simonds wrote his book in response to what he saw as alarming changes in the American landscape. Through it, he hoped to teach both professional and general audiences how to read the natural landscape, and to respect and protect its beauty while creating ever more harmonious places in which to live.

This reprint edition includes a new introduction by Robert E. Grese, which places Simonds's gracefully written text in historical perspective, elucidating many of the broad themes of the profession's early years.

Published in association with Library of American Landscape History: http://lalh.org/
 

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Contents

LANDSCAPEGARDENING FOR ARID AND SEMIARID REGIONS
185
PUBLIC THOROUGHFARES
192
THE HILLSIDE ROAD
199
THE RIVER ROAD
206
THE PRAIRIE ROAD
211
CITY STREETS
217
BILLBOARDS
223
THE GROUNDS OF RAILWAY STATIONS AND RIGHTS OF WAY
224

VINES
53
HERBACEOUS FLOWERING PLANTS
55
FERNS
56
MOSSES AND LICHENS
57
ARRANGEMENT OF PLANTING
58
How TO PLANT
68
PLANTING MEDIUMSIZED TREES
70
PLANTING LARGE TREES
72
PLANTING BUSHES AND HERBACEOUS SUBJECTS
76
CARE OF PLANT MATERIALS
78
WATER
84
SPRINGS
86
STREAMS
88
LAKES
104
HOME GROUNDS
118
WALKS AND DRIVES
124
GARAGES
138
SERVICE YARDS
140
FRONT YARDS
141
FLOWERGARDENS
153
VEGETABLEGARDENS
157
TERRACES
159
HEDGES
161
WOODS
162
FARMS
170
THE FARM FOREST
176
THE FARM ORCHARD AND OTHER FEATURES
182
PARKS FOREST PRESERVES CITY SQUARES
232
PLANNING A PARK
237
GROUNDS FOR GAMES OR RECREATION
242
OTHER PURPOSES OF A PARK
247
THE PARK COMMISSION
248
FOREST PRESERVES
250
CITY SQUARES AND TRIANGLES
253
COUNTRY PARKS
256
TOWNSHIP PARKS
257
COUNTY PARKS
258
STATE PARKS
260
NATIONAL PARKS
261
GOLF GROUNDS
263
SCHOOL GROUNDS
273
IN CITIES
278
ARBORETUMS AND BOTANIC GARDENS
281
BOTANIC GARDENS
286
CEMETERIES
290
SUBDIVISIONS WALKS AND DRIVES
293
BUILDINGS AND PLANTING
297
RULES FOR MAINTAINING CEMETERIES
301
COUNTRY CEMETERIES
307
CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING
310
APPENDIX
321
PARKS AND LANDSCAPEGARDENING
325
Copyright

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Page lviii - THE FARMER'S BUSINESS HANDBOOK. Roberts. THE DISEASES OF ANIMALS. Mayo. THE HORSE. Roberts. How TO CHOOSE A FARM. Hunt. FORAGE CROPS. Voorhees. BACTERIA IN RELATION TO COUNTRY LIFE. Lipman.
Page xxxvi - The guiding spirit was that respect for the quieter beauties of native vegetation which comes to every cultured person after he has lived a few years among the showiest plants from all foreign lands as assembled in ordinary nurseries and in the front yards of beginners. Graceland was to be a place of rest and peace, not a museum or a gaudy show. Should not the same ideal prevail in our home grounds? The first piece of work done by Mr. Simonds that suggests what is now called "restoration...
Page 3 - I have adopted the term Landscape Gardening, as most proper, because the art can only be advanced and perfected by the united powers of the landscape painter and the practical gardener.

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About the author (1920)

Robert E. Grese is associate professor of landscape architecture at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and director of the Nichols Arboretum.

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