Landscape: Pattern, Perception, and Process

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Taylor & Francis, 1999 - Gardening - 344 pages
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Providing a fresh approach to the theory of design, Landscape: Pattern, Perception and Process synthesizes planning, design and ecology and shows a new view of where design can develop. The book brings together the work and subject areas of a range of disciplines including psychologists, philosophers, geologists, ecologists, cultural geographers, foresters, urban planners and landscape architects and synthesizes all these together. Since many landscape and environmental problems require multi-disciplinary approaches for their solution, this book demonstrates how the best integration can be achieved.
Highly illustrated, it contains examples from North America, Canada, Europe and Australasia. Glossary, references and further reading provide the reader with guidance and back-up resources.
 

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Contents

What Are Patterns? Patterns are all Around Us
11
What are Patterns?
12
Towards an Understanding of Patterns in an Uncertain World
14
Geometric Principles
18
Review of Pattern Analysis Methods
21
Mosaic Landscapes
30
Patterns Created by People
35
Summary and Conclusions
38
Moulding the Land
126
Relevance of Landform Patterns
144
Analysing Landform Patterns
145
Analysing Hydrological Patterns
151
Design of Landforms to Reflect Natural Patterns
152
Summary and Conclusions
160
Ecosystem Patterns Introduction
161
Landform Effects on Ecosystem Patterns and Processes
162

The Perception Of Patterns Introduction The Senses and Their Use in Perception
39
Light as the Medium of Visual Perception
42
The Physiology of Visual Perception
44
The Psychology of Visual Perception
47
Processes of Pattern Recognition
58
Summary and Conclusions
61
The AESTHETICS Of The Landscape Introduction
63
The Nature of Aesthetics
64
Environment and Landscape
65
What is an Aesthetic Experience?
67
Pleasure as a Part of the Aesthetic Experience
70
Beauty and the Sublime
72
The Aesthetic Theory of Alfred North Whitehead
76
Ecology and Aesthetics
81
The Individual Versus Universal Appreciation
82
Integration of Perception and Knowledge
85
Characteristics and Qualities in the Landscape
86
The Aesthetics of Engagement
89
Summary and Conclusions
94
Design For Landscapes Introduction The Place of Landscape Design and Designers
97
Design Methods and Practice
101
Creativity as Part of the Design Process
107
Modelling the Past Present and Future Landscape
112
Summary and Conclusions
117
Landform Patterns Introduction The Structure of the Earths Crust
119
Vulcanism
121
Mountain Building
124
Structure and Dynamics
168
Natural Disturbance in the Landscape
187
Analysing Ecological Patterns
206
Landscape Ecological Analysis
211
Designing Ecosystems
226
Summary and Conclusions
232
Human Patterns Introduction
241
HunterGatherers
243
Pastoral Landscapes
245
Early Cultivated Landscapes
248
The Pattern of Agricultural Development
249
Planned Landscapes
261
Settlement Patterns
273
Towns and Cities
286
The Preconquest Landscape of Mexico
292
Conclusions to the Study of Human Patterns
294
Analysing Cultural Patterns
295
Designing with Cultural Patterns
310
Summary and Conclusions
320
Reclaiming The Landscape Introduction
321
I How can current political and legislative initiatives for protecting the environment be translated into more effective action using limited resources?
322
2 How can relationships between communities and landscapes be revitalized and how can people in these communities become more involved in dev...
324
3 How can scientific and professional landscape and environmental disciplines be better integrated so that truly holistic sustainable solutions are achie...
327
4 Where should the understanding of pattern and process based planning and design be applied?
328
BIBLIOGRAPHY
333
INDEX
337
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About the author (1999)

Simon Bell is Chief Landscape Architect to the British Forestry Commission.

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