Landscape in Sight: Looking at America

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Yale University Press, Jan 1, 1997 - Gardening - 400 pages
During a long and distinguished career, John Brinckerhoff Jackson (1909-1996) brought about a new understanding and appreciation of the American landscape. Hailed in 1995 by New York Times architectural critic Herbert Muschamp as 'America’s greatest living writer on the forces that have shaped the land this nation occupies,' Jackson founded Landscape Magazine in 1951, taught at Harvard University and the University of California at Berkeley, and wrote nearly 200 essays and reviews. This appealing anthology of his most important writings on the American landscape, illustrated with his own sketches and photographs, brings together Jackson’s most famous essays, significant but less well known writings, and articles that were originally published unsigned or under various pseudonyms. Jackson also completed a new essay for this volume, 'Places for Fun and Games,' a few months before his death. Focusing not on nature but on landscape - land shaped by human presence - Jackson insists in his writings that the workaday world gives form to the essential American landscape. In the everyday places of the countryside and city, he discerns texts capable of revealing important truths about society and culture, present and past. For this collection Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz provides an introduction that discusses the larger body of Jackson’s writing and locates each of the selected essays within his oeuvre. She also includes a complete bibliography of Jackson’s writings.
 

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LANDSCAPE IN SIGHT: Looking at America

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A large and varied sampler of essays by the late doyen of American cultural geography, who died in 1996. To judge by this well-edited assemblage, spanning half a century, Jackson (``Brink'' to friends ... Read full review

Landscape in sight: looking at America

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Jackson was greatly admired as a renaissance man of the American landscape: he sketched it, traveled through it, observed it, and wrote about it in essays that integrated his knowledge of urban ... Read full review

Contents

The Strangers Path
19
The Almost Perfect Town
31
Chihuahua as We Might Have Been
43
Looking at New Mexico
55
The Accessible Landscape
68
The WestwardMoving House
81
Ghosts at the Door
107
The Domestication of the Garage
118
The Vernacular City
237
Roads Belong in the Landscape abridged
249
Truck City
255
Takingon the Modern Movement
269
Review of Built in U S A H G West
277
Hail and Farewell
285
From Whither Architecture? Some Outside Views
292
The Word Itself
299

The Courthouse the Small
139
The Centennial Years
149
High Plains
160
Jefferson Thoreau and After
175
OtherDirected Houses
185
The Abstract World of the HotRodder
199
The Movable Dwelling and How It Came to America
210
An Engineered Environment
225
Contents
232
How to Study the Landscape
307
The Tale of a House Ajax
321
Notes and Comments
333
To Pity the Plumage and Forget the Dying Bird
355
SterileRestorations Cannot Replace a Sense
366
Expulsion from the Garden 340
371
Notes
373
Index
393
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz is professor of history and American studies at Smith College.

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