Langston Hughes: critical perspectives past and present

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Amistad, 1993 - Biography & Autobiography - 255 pages
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A collection of reviews and essays discusses the author's poetry and other works, revealing how reviewers missed the complexity of his writing, and how understanding of his work has developed

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Contents

The Weary Blues 1926
3
Not Without Laughter 1930
13
The Big Sea 1940
21
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Henry Louis Gates was born on September 16, 1950, in Keyser, West Virginia. A respected scholar in African American Studies, Gates graduated from Yale and Cambridge universities. A visit to Africa during the 1970s further developed his interest in African American literature and culture and helped him expand his theories. He is responsible for rediscovering and reviving many writings by black authors, and his goal is to restore the role of black literature in its proper context. He has written numerous historical books including Colored People: A Memoir, A Chronology of African-American History, and The Future of the Race. Gates also has his critics; his appearance at the obscenity trial of the rap group 2 Live Crew was seen as flagrantly self-advancing, and he has been accused of being overly Afrocentric. Nevertheless, his reputation as a scholar is well-deserved. Not only has he taught at Harvard, Yale, Duke, and Cornell, but he has been awarded many honors, including the highly coveted MacArthur Foundation "genius grant.

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. is the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor, Chair of the Department of African and African American Studies, and Director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University. Professor Gates is well known as an innovator in the
field of African American studies and as the author of numerous works, including America Behind the Color Line: Dialogues with African Americans, The Trials of Phillis Wheatly, and Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Black Man. Gates also co-edited African American Lives, a one-volume collection of
biographies that precedes the upcoming, eight-volume African American National Biography.
Kwame Anthony Appiah is the Lawrence S. Rockefeller Professor of Philosophy and the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University. He is the author of Assertion and Conditionals, For Truth in Semantics, and In My Father's House: Africa in the Philosophy of Culture (OUP 1992). Appiah is
also a novelist and poet and he recently collaborated with his mother to compile a collection of proverbs from his homeland, Asante, Ghana.

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