Language, Politics, Elites and the Public Sphere: Western India Under Colonialism

Front Cover
Anthem Press, 2002 - History - 300 pages
0 Reviews

The bilingual relationship between the English and the Indian vernaculars has long been crucial to the construction of ideology as well as cultural and political hierarchies. Print was vital for colonial literacy; it was thereby instrumental in initiating a shift in the relation between 'high' and 'low' languages. Here, Dr Naregal examines the relationship between linguistic hierarchies, textual practices and power in colonial western India. Whereas most studies of colonialism focus on India's 'high' literary culture, this book looks at how local intellectuals exploited their 'middling' position through such initiatives as the establishment of newspapers and of influential channels of communication.

How were the 'native' intelligentsia able to achieve a position of ideological influence? Dr Naregal shows that, despite their minority position, such people negotiated the arenas of education policy, the press and voluntary associations to advance their social class. In doing this, she sheds light on the process of self-definition among the Indian intelligentsia before anticolonial thinking articulated its hegemonic claims as a nationalistic discourse.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

TEXTUAL HIERARCIIIES LITERATE AUDIENCES
6
Literate and Literary Practices in the Peshwa Period
22
Colonialism Comparative Philology and Remaking
38
Conclusion
53
The Society for the Promotion of Education
93
COLONIAL EDUCATION AND THE CULTIVATION
101
Instituting
137
COLONIAL POWER PRINT AND THE REMAKING
145
The Beginnings of Print and the Making
160
Pandits Sbastris and the Making of Early
168
The Early Marathi
190
BILINGUALISM HEGEMONY AND THE SWING
201
CONCLUSION
265
Glossary
273
Index
291
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Veena Naregal completed her PhD at SOAS (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London). This book reflects her multi-disciplinary interests in post-colonial theory, alternative modernities and contemporary cultural politics.

Bibliographic information