Language and Gender

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 9, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 366 pages
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This is a new introduction to the study of the relation between gender and language use, written by two of the leading experts in the field. It covers the main topics, beginning with a clear discussion of gender and of the resources that the linguistic system offers for the construction of social meaning. The body of the book offers unprecedented breadth and depth in its coverage of the interaction between language and social life. It is the ideal textbook for students in language and gender courses in several disciplines, including linguistics, gender studies, women's studies, sociology, and anthropology.
 

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Contents

Constructing deconstructing and reconstructing gender
7
Sex and gender
8
Learning to be gendered
13
the gender order
30
Masculinities and femininities
45
Gender practice
48
Linking the linguistic to the social
50
Changing practices changing ideologies
51
Saying and implying
188
Aspects of meaning in communicative practice
191
gender schemas and ideologies
199
Assigning roles and responsibility
203
Making metaphors
209
Mapping the world
224
Category boundaries and criteria
228
Category relations
238

The social locus of change
53
Linguistic resources
58
Analytic practice
77
A matter of method
82
Organizing talk
89
Access to situations and events
90
Speech activities
96
Speech situations and events
101
The pursuit of conversation
107
Conversational styles and conversationalists character
120
Making social moves
127
Speech act theory
128
gender oppositions
131
Speech acts embedded in social action
142
Beyond conversation
154
Positioning ideas and subjects
155
Womens language and gendered positioning
156
Showing deference or respect?
158
Backing down or opening things up?
163
Who cares? intensity and engagement
172
Calibrating commitment and enlisting support
179
Speaking indirectly
184
Elaborating marked concepts
242
category imperialism
250
Genderizing processes
255
New labels new categories
257
Working the market use of varieties
262
The linguistic market
267
The local and the global
269
Language ideologies and linguistic varieties
272
standardization and the Japanese woman
274
Gender and language ideologies
277
Gender and the use of linguistic varieties
278
Access
284
Whose speech is more standard?
288
Fashioning selves
301
Stylistic practice
302
Style and performativity
311
Legitimate and illegitimate performances
316
One small step
321
Where are we headed?
326
Bibliography
329
Index
353
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About the author (2003)

Penelope Eckert is Professor of Linguistics, Professor (by courtesy) of Cultural and Social Anthropology and Director of the Program in Feminist Studies at Stanford University. She has published the ethnography Jocks and Burnouts: Social Categories and Identity in the High School (1989), the book Linguistic Variation as Social Practice (2000), and many linguistic articles.

Sally McConnell-Ginet is Professor of Linguistics at the Department of Linguistics, Cornell University. Together with Ruth Borker and literary scholar Nelly Furman, she edited and contributed to Women and Language in Gender and Society and with linguist Gennaro Chierchia, co-authored Meaning and Grammar: An Introduction to Semantics, which has recently been revised for a second edition.

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