Las grandes elegías y otros poemas

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Fundacion Biblioteca Ayacuch, Jan 1, 1984 - Cuban poetry - 454 pages
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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
28
Section 3
32
Section 4
47
Section 5
52
Section 6
64
Section 7
80
Section 8
107
Section 19
315
Section 20
327
Section 21
345
Section 22
354
Section 23
361
Section 24
376
Section 25
380
Section 26
383

Section 9
136
Section 10
151
Section 11
169
Section 12
194
Section 13
220
Section 14
230
Section 15
261
Section 16
274
Section 17
291
Section 18
311
Section 27
386
Section 28
387
Section 29
392
Section 30
401
Section 31
402
Section 32
404
Section 33
447
Section 34
457
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About the author (1984)

Guillen, one of the leaders of the Afro-Antillean school of poetry, was inspired by popular dance, ballads, song rhythms, and speech patterns, all of which show a heavy African influence. In his first volumes, Motives of Sound (1930) and Songoro Cosongo (1931), meaning is communicated primarily through sound, and many poems are in regional popular dialect. Much of his subsequent poetry reflects his profound social commitment: West Indies Limited (1934) opposes imperialism, and Spain (1937) expresses his support for the republic during the Spanish civil war. Tengo (1964) deals with the Cuban Revolution in a tone aimed at a popular audience. All Guillen's work is an intense effort to relate poetry to the culture of the Cuban people and to political and social protest.

Bibliographic information