Latin Literature

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 304 pages
This highly accessible, user-friendly work provides a fresh and illuminating introduction to the most important aspects of Latin prose and poetry.
Readers are constantly encouraged to think for themselves about how and why we study the texts in question. They are stimulated and inspired to do their own further reading through engagement with a wide selection of translated extracts, and with a useful exploration of the different ways in which they can be approached. Central throughout is the theme of the fundamental connections between Latin literature and issues of elite Roman culture.
The versatile structure of the book makes it suitable both for individual and class use.
 

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Contents

Augustus wearing a cuirass from the Villa of Livia at Prima Porta
10
Role models for Roman women and
20
Titian Tarquin and Lucretia
30
Gentileschi Tarquin and Lucretia
31
Tiepolo Tarquin and Lucretia
32
What is Latin literature?
37
What does studying Latin literature involve?
53
multiculturalism
70
Introspection and individual identity
176
Literary texture and intertextuality
190
Metapoetics
207
Edward BurneJones Pygmalion and The Image ii
212
The Hand Refrains
214
The Soul Attains
215
Allegory
225
Prudentius Psychomachia
238

Sketch map of the triumphal route through Rome
80
Performance and spectacle life and death
89
praise politics
110
living death
133
Writing real lives
152
Cycle of virtues and vices on Notre Dame Cathedral
239
Building Rome and building Roman
265
List of authors and texts
288
Index of passages quoted
303
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