Latin themes of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots: Published, for the first time, from the original manuscript in her own handwriting, now preserved in the Imperial Library, Paris

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Warton Club, 1855 - Queens - 79 pages
 

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Page 41 - I WONDER, by my troth, what thou and I Did, till we lov'd? Were we not wean'd till then? But suck'd on country pleasures, childishly ? Or snorted we in the seven sleepers
Page 101 - By our first strange and fatal interview, By all desires which thereof did ensue, By our long starving hopes, by that remorse Which my words...
Page 117 - And new philosophy calls all in doubt, The element of fire is quite put out; The sun is lost, and th'earth, and no man's wit Can well direct him where to look for it.
Page 143 - Divorce mee, untie, or breake that knot againe, Take mee to you, imprison mee, for I Except you enthrall mee, never shall be free, Nor ever chast, except you ravish mee.
Page 93 - I scarce beleeve my love to be so pure As I had thought it was, Because it doth endure Vicissitude, and season, as the grasse; Me thinkes I lyed all winter, when I swore, My love was infinite, if spring make'it more.
Page 43 - Late schoole boyes, and sowre prentices, Goe tell Court-huntsmen, that the King will ride, Call countrey ants to harvest offices; Love, all alike, no season knowes, nor clyme, Nor houres, dayes, moneths, which are the rags of time.
Page 95 - So must pure lovers' souls descend To affections, and to faculties, Which sense may reach and apprehend, Else a great prince in prison lies.
Page 156 - No spring, nor summer beauty hath such grace, As I have seen in one autumnal face.
Page 41 - Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone, Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown; Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.
Page 46 - Yet do not, I would not go, Though at next door we might meet, Though she were true, when you met her, And last, till you write your letter, Yet she Will be False, ere I come, to two, or three.

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