Laughing Gods, Weeping Virgins: Laughter in the History of Religion

Front Cover
Routledge, Jan 11, 2013 - History - 184 pages
0 Reviews
Laughing Gods, Weeping Virgins analyses how laughter has been used as a symbol in myths, rituals and festivals of Western religions, and has thus been inscribed in religious discourse. The Mesopotamian Anu, the Israelite Jahweh, the Greek Dionysos, the Gnostic Christ and the late modern Jesus were all laughing gods. Through their laughter, gods prove both their superiority and their proximity to humans.
In this comprehensive study, Professor Gilhus examines the relationship between corporeal human laughter and spiritual divine laughter from c`ussical antiquity, to the Christian West and the modern era. She combines the study of the history of religion with social-scientific approaches, to provide an original and pertinent exploration of a universal human phenomenon, and its significance for the development of religions.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
1 the Ancient Near East
15
2 Greece
30
3 Rome
46
4 Early Christianity
64
5 Medieval Christianity
83
6 Modernity and the Remythologization of Laughter ...
109
7 Religion of Jokes
131
Conclusion
145
Notes
150
Bibliography
163
Index
182
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)

University of Bergen, Norway

Bibliographic information