Lawyers in Conflict: Australian Lawyers and Legal Aid

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Federation Press, 2006 - Law - 246 pages
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This book provides a comprehensive account of the modern Australian legal aid system. It charts the twists and turns of policy and practice over the past 30 years with a particular focus on:the reaction of the legal profession to conflicts and debates about legal aid policy and services and the way in which this has both reflected and accentuated major shifts in the social and political structure of the profession itself; the development of community legal centres from radical fringe organisations to accepted legal practices, which provide a ‘value for money’ service and work in alliance with the big city firms; the constancy of government calls for fiscal restraint and the recurrent lack of clear objectives despite widely varying approaches by different administrations.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Professional conflict and welfarism
9
Legal needs and the origins of contemporary legal aid
24
Public aid and social democratic vision
50
Professional reactions mobilisation and division
75
Fraserism conflict and State commissions
105
Professional change neoIiberalism and the state
139
Growth consolidation and crisis
149
From providers to purchasers and suppliers
178
Autonomous and alternative
199
Professionalism and Australian legal aid in retrospect
231
Index
243
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Thomson lectures at the University of Reading.

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