Leadership Lessons from West Point

Front Cover
Major Doug Crandall
John Wiley and Sons, Mar 9, 2010 - Business & Economics - 432 pages
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With Leadership Lessons from West Point as a guide, leaders in the business, nonprofit, and government sectors can learn leadership techniques and practices from contributors who are teaching or have taught at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and have served in positions of leadership that span the globe. These military experts cover a broad range of topics that are relevant to any leadership development program in any sector. The articles in this important resource offer insight into what leadership means to these experts—in both war and peacetime—and describe their views on quiet leadership, mission, values, taking care of people, organizational learning, and leading change.
 

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Great leadership book with a plethora of stories to demonstrate leadership principles. One of the best leadership books written.

Contents

PART II LEADERSHIP STYLES AND SITUATIONS
131
PART III LEADING ORGANIZATIONS
279

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About the author (2010)

Major Doug Crandall is the executive officer to the Dean of the Academic Board at the United States Military Academy (U.S.M.A.) West Point. He was previously an assistant professor in the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership, where he served as course director for Leading Organizations Through Change and Advanced Military Leadership and received the Excellence in Teaching Award. Crandall has a B.S. from the U.S.M.A. and an M.B.A. from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

The Leader to Leader Institute's mission is to strengthen leadership in the social sector. Established in 1990 as the Peter F. Drucker Foundation for Nonprofit Management, the Institute furthers its mission by providing social sector leaders with the essential leadership wisdom, inspiration, and resources needed to lead for innovation and to build vibrant social sector organizations.

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