Learning English: Development and Diversity

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Neil Mercer, Joan Swann
Psychology Press, 1996 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 343 pages
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This book examines the processes of language acquisition in English, as well as what it means to learn English in different parts of the world. It will be of particular interest to all students of English in Education and Applied Linguistics.English is learnt, internationally, in a range of diverse settings. This book examines processes of language acquisition in English, as well as what it means to learn English in different parts of the world. It looks at the place of English within formal education, and at some of the controversies that have surrounded the teaching of English.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
1 ENGLISH AS A FIRST LANGUAGE
5
2 ENGLISH IN THE REPERTOIRE
46
3 LEARNING TO READ AND WRITE IN ENGLISH
84
4 ENGLISH AS A CLASSROOM LANGUAGE
132
5 A HISTORY OF ENGLISH TEACHING
172
6 ISSUES IN ENGLISH TEACHING
222
7 ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES
262
8 ENGLISH IN THE ACADEMIC WORLD
305
REFERENCES
346
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
363
INDEX
366
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Mercer is Professor of Language and Communications at the Open University.

Mary Jane Kehily is a lecturer in Childhood Studies at The Open University. Her background is in cultural studies and education and her research interests are in gender and sexuality, narrative and identity, and popular culture. She has published widely on these themes. Recent publications include "Sexuality, Gender and Schooling: Shifting Agendas in Social Learning" (Routledge, 2002); 'Sexing the subject: Teachers, pedagogies and sex education', "Sex Education," 2002, 3(3); and 'Learning to Laugh', A study of Schoolboy humour in the English secondary school' in "What About the Boys? Issues of Masculinities in Schools" (edited by Martino and Meyenn, Open University Press 2001, with Nayak). She is also director of a research project exploring the cultural meanings of drugs and drug use in young people's lives.

Joan Swann is a senior lecturer in the Centre for Language and Communications at The Open University. She worked initially as a secondary school teacher before joining The Open University. She has contributed to several Open University courses, particularly in the areas of language and education, English language and linguistics. As a sociolinguist, her main research interests are in language and gender, children's language and classroom language, and she has researched and published widely in these areas. Recent publications include Introducing Sociolinguistics (Edinburgh University Press, 2002, with Mesthrie, Deumert and Leap); 'Yes, but is it gender?' in "Gender Identity and Discourse Analysis" (edited by Litosseliti and Sunderland, Benjamins, 2002); and 'Schooled language: language and gender in educational settings' in "The Handbook of Language and Gender" (Holmes andMeyerhoff, Blackwell Publishers, 2003).

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