Learning by Doing in Markets, Firms, and Countries

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University of Chicago Press, Feb 15, 1999 - Business & Economics - 347 pages
Learning by Doing in Markets, Firms, and Countries draws out the underlying economics in business history by focusing on learning processes and the development of competitively valuable asymmetries. The essays show that organizations, like people, learn that this process can be organized more or less effectively, which can have major implications for how competition works.

The first three essays in this volume explore techniques firms have used to both manage information to create valuable asymmetries and to otherwise suppress unwelcome competition. The next three focus on the ways in which firms have built special capabilities over time, capabilities that have been both sources of competitive advantage and resistance to new opportunities. The last two extend the notion of learning from the level of firms to that of nations. The collection as a whole builds on the previous two volumes to make the connection between information structure and product market outcomes in business history.


 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Early Twentieth Centuries
19
Adam B Jaffe
57
Jeremy Atack
91
Margaret Levenstein
138
Ross Thomson
179
Assets Organizations Strategies
185
Can a Nation Learn? American Technology
295
Contributors
333
Subject Index
341
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Naomi R. Lamoreaux is the Stanley B. Resor Professor of Economics and History at Yale University and a research associate of the NBER.

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