Learning from Asian philosophy

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Oxford University Press, 1999 - Philosophy - 208 pages
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In an attempt to bridge the vast divide between classical Asian thought and contemporary Western philosophy, Joel J. Kupperman finds that the two traditions do not, by and large, supply different answers to the same questions. Rather, each tradition is searching for answers to their own set of questions--mapping out distinct philosophical investigations.In this groundbreaking book, Kupperman argues that the foundational Indian and Chinese texts include lines of thought that can enrich current philosophical practice, and in some cases provide uniquely sophisticated insights. Special attention is given to the ethical issues of formation and fluidity of self, the nature and possibilities of choice, the compartmentalization of life implicit in some ethical systems, the variations of ethical demands from person to person, and the nature of philosophy itself as a communicative activity. This study will provide a wealth of information for philosophers seeking a closer knowledge of Asian philosophy and general readers with an interest in Eastern thought.

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Contents

Introduction
3
The Formation of Self as an Ethical Problem
15
Debates over the Self
57
Copyright

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About the author (1999)


Joel J. Kupperman is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Connecticut, and has been a visiting professor at colleges in Oxford and Cambridge. His previous books include Ethical Knowledge (1970), The Foundations of Morality (1983), Character (1991), and Value . . . And What Follows (1999).

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