Leaves from the Journal of a Subaltern During the Campaign in the Punjaub, Sept. 1848 to March 1849

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William Blackwood, 1849 - Sikh War, 1848-1849 - 227 pages
 

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Page 156 - ... most heart-rending sight of the day was one I witnessed in a tent I entered. There, on the ground, bleeding to death, lay a young mother ; her leg had been carried off by a round shot, and the jagged stump protruded in a ghastly manner through the mangled flesh. She held a baby to her breast, and as she bent over it with maternal anxiety, all her thoughts seemed to be of her child. She appeared totally regardless of the agony she must have been suffering, and to think of nothing but the poor...
Page 152 - Sikhs stood and fought like men, but the greater portion (there must have been at least 1000) left the village at one end as we entered at the other. Those who remained were shot or bayoneted on the spot. There was no quarter given. A number of them shut themselves up in the houses, but our men beat down the doors, and poured in volley after volley, and sullenly and savagely they died fighting to the last. We captured three of their standards in the...
Page 152 - Our men, who had been held down all the time, started up with a cheer. It was the last some of them gave, poor fellows ! A round shot took off a man's head close to me, and spattered his brains in my face, the bullets whizzing about like hail, and, as we came nearer, grape was poured into us ; but not a man wavered for a second. ' Officers to the front — lead on your men...
Page 103 - H the roll of musketry increasing every moment. On we went at a rapid double, dashing through the bushes and bounding over every impediment ; faster rolled the musketry — crash upon crash the cannon poured forth its deadly contents. On swept our brigade, and, gaining an open space in the jungle, the whole of the enemy's line burst on our view.
Page 104 - The enemy's bullets whizzed above our heads ; the very air seemed teeming with them ; man after man was struck down and rolled in the dust. But a passing glance was all we could give them. And onward we went, bearing on their line with a steadiness which nothing could resist. They fired a last volley, wavered, and then turned and fled, leaving the ground covered with dead and wounded. Pursuit in a jungle like that was useless, where we could not see twenty yards before us ; so we halted, and began...
Page 154 - Cavalry charged in among them, and the Horse Artillery rattled on at a gallop, mowing them down in heaps, while we took possession of their guns and camp, leaving the Cavalry to deal with the fugitives ; and awful execution they did amongst them, as we heard afterwards.
Page 190 - Singh's veterans. One old fellow I noticed, in particular, he stood for a long time looking wistfully at his arms, and the pile before him, and evidently could not make up his mind to give them up. At last, the officer on duty came...
Page 155 - ... have cause to remember the battle of Goojerat. The whole line of their flight was strewed wi.th dead. We advanced into their camp over heaps of dead and dying. It wanted nothing more to show the gallant stand they had made. Everything was in confusion — tumbrils overturned, guns dismounted, wagons with their wheels off", oxen and camels rushing wildly about, wounded horses plunging in their agony, beds, blankets, boxes, ammunition strewed...

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