Lectures on Art

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Page 230 - ... of the varied life of men, and the very sky and waste of air above us, have seemed all to conspire together to make us calm and happy, not slothful but restful. Still oftener belike it has given us those other times, when at last, after many a struggle with incongruous hindrances, our own chosen work has lain before us disentangled from all encumbrances and unrealities, and we have felt that nothing could withhold us, not even ourselves, from doing the work we were born to do, and that we were...
Page 168 - ... by any but natural change, it fills us with a satisfying untroubled happiness that few things else could bring us. Must our necessities destroy, must our restless ambition mar, the sources of this innocent pleasure, which rich and poor may share alike— this communion with the very hearts of the departed men ? Must we sweep away these touching memories of our stout forefathers and their troublous days that won our present peace and liberties ? " If our necessities compel us to it, I say we are...
Page 218 - And once more; whatever you have in your rooms think first of the walls; for they are that which makes your house and home...
Page 218 - XV's time, seems to me merely ridiculous. So I say our furniture should be good citizen's furniture, solid and well made in workmanship, and in design should have nothing about it that is not easily defensible, no monstrosities or extravagances, not even of beauty, lest we weary of it: as to matters of construction, it should not have to depend on the special skill of a very- picked workman, or the superexcellence of his glue, but be made on the proper principles of the art of joinery: also I think...
Page 152 - Eoman art, the last of the old, into Byzantine art, the first of the new. It lingered long. For long there was still some show of life in the sick art of the older world ; that art had been so powerful, so systematised, that it was not easy to get rid even of its dead body.
Page 215 - ... some beautiful piece of nature must have pressed itself on our notice so forcibly that we are quite full of it, and can, by submitting ourselves to the rules of art, express our pleasure to others, and give them some of the keen delight that we ourselves have felt.
Page 129 - Roman decadence, by others from the same author,1 dealing with the early days of that " modern," or mediaeval architecture which sprang from it. " Spalato was built about 323 AD, St. Sophia in 530. More than 200 years are between them, by no means fertile of beautiful or remarkable buildings, but St. Sophia once built, the earth began to blossom with beautiful buildings, and the thousand years that lie between the date of St. Sophia and the date of St.
Page 151 - Roman pattern design that clove to the arts. There is no mystery in them, and little interest in their growth, though they are rich and handsome ; indeed, they scarcely do grow at all, they are rather stuck together ; for the real connected pattern, where one member grows naturally and necessarily out of another — where the whole thing is alive as a real tree or flower is — all this is an invention of what followed Roman art, and is unknown both to the classical and the ancient world.
Page 179 - There is a vast deal of labour spent in supplying civilised man with things which he has come to consider needful, and which, as a rule, he will not do without. Much of that labour is grievous and oppressive; but since there is much more of grievous labour in the world than there used to be, it is clear that there is more than there need be, and more than there will be in time to come, if only men of goodwill look to it; what therefore can we do towards furthering that good time and reducing the...
Page 190 - ... potters strove so hard to imitate. They were indeed valuable qualities in the hands of a Chinaman, deft as he was of execution, fertile of design, fanciful though not imaginative; in short, a born maker of pretty toys; but such daintinesses were of little avail to a good workman of our race, eager, impatient, imaginative, with something of melancholy or moroseness even in his sport, his very jokes two-edged and fierce, he had other work to do, if his employers but knew it, than the making of...

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