Lectures on Eloquence and Style

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Gould and Newman, 1836 - Elocution - 186 pages
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Page 180 - Tremble, thou earth, at the presence of the Lord, at the presence of the God of Jacob.
Page 167 - Jesus saith unto her, Woman, why weepest thou ? whom seekest thou ? She, supposing him to be the gardener, saith unto him, Sir, if thou have borne him hence, tell me where thou hast laid him, and I will take him away. Jesus saith unto her, Mary. She turned herself, and saith unto him, Rabboni ; which is to sa.y. Master.
Page 175 - And, behold, there was a great earthquake: for the angel of the Lord descended from heaven, and came and rolled back the stone from the door, and sat upon it. His countenance was like lightning, and his raiment white as snow: And for fear of him the keepers did shake, and became as dead men.
Page 179 - The addition of his empire, how it show'd In prospect from his throne, how good, how fair, Answering his great idea. Up he rode, Follow'd with acclamation, and the sound Symphonious of ten thousand harps, that tuned Angelic harmonies: the earth, the air Resounded, (thou remember'st, for thou heard'st,) The heavens and all the constellations rung, The planets in their station listening stood, While the bright pomp ascended jubilant. Open, ye everlasting gates!
Page 180 - Sing, O heavens ; and be joyful, O earth ; and break forth into singing, O mountains : for the Lord hath comforted his people, and will have mercy upon his afflicted.
Page 161 - Consider the lilies how they grow: they toil not, they spin not; and yet I say unto you, that Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.
Page 180 - For ye shall go out with joy, and be led forth with peace: the mountains and the hills shall break forth before you into singing, and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands.
Page 180 - WHEN Israel went out of Egypt, The house of Jacob from a people of strange language ; Judah was his sanctuary, And Israel his dominion.
Page 164 - ... others slowly and servilely creeping in his train, while the poet himself is all the time proceeding with an unaffected and equal majesty before them. However, of the two extremes one...
Page 117 - The great pest of speech is frequency of translation. No book was ever turned from one language into another, without imparting something of its native idiom...

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