Legacies: The Story of the Immigrant Second Generation

Front Cover
University of California Press, May 31, 2001 - Social Science - 430 pages
4 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
One out of five Americans, more than 55 million people, are first-or second-generation immigrants. This landmark study, the most comprehensive to date, probes all aspects of the new immigrant second generation's lives, exploring their immense potential to transform American society for better or worse. Whether this new generation reinvigorates the nation or deepens its social problems depends on the social and economic trajectories of this still young population. In Legacies, Alejandro Portes and Rubén G. Rumbaut—two of the leading figures in the field—provide a close look at this rising second generation, including their patterns of acculturation, family and school life, language, identity, experiences of discrimination, self-esteem, ambition, and achievement.

Based on the largest research study of its kind, Legacies combines vivid vignettes with a wealth of survey and school data. Accessible, engaging, and indispensable for any consideration of the changing face of American society, this book presents a wide range of real-life stories of immigrant families—from Mexico, Cuba, Nicaragua, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, the Philippines, China, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam—now living in Miami and San Diego, two of the areas most heavily affected by the new immigration. The authors explore the world of second-generation youth, looking at patterns of parent-child conflict and cohesion within immigrant families, the role of peer groups and school subcultures, the factors that affect the children's academic achievement, and much more.

A companion volume to Legacies, entitled Ethnicities: Children of Immigrants in America, was published by California in Fall 2001. Edited by the authors of Legacies, this book will bring together some of the country's leading scholars of immigration and ethnicity to provide a close look at this rising second generation.

A Copublication with the Russell Sage Foundation
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - SadieSForsythe - LibraryThing

Legacies tackles a notoriously slippery and difficult subject, and it does so admirably. As a social researcher looking at social identity, Legacies was repeatedly recommend to me (always with high ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Legacies tackles a notoriously slippery and difficult subject, and it does so admirably. As a social researcher looking at social identity, Legacies was repeatedly recommend to me (always with high praise, and often accompanied by an and exclamation mark). I lost track of the number of times I heard, "Oh have you read Legacies yet? You really have to." I am familiar with the work of both Portes and Rumbolt, and they maintained their high standards throughout this text. Legacies is not always easy to read, mind you. It can be dry at times, as any book covering quantitative data tends to be. But the character profiles in the early chapters helps to soften the tendency significantly. While not wholly without criticism, the research methods are sound and the sample size significant. I too would recommend it to readers interested in the changing dynamic of the American population. It challenges some firmly held dogmas, and sadly highlights some of the social ills we all wish would be found to be untrue.  

Contents

IV
xxiii
V
xxiv
VI
1
VII
2
VIII
4
IX
5
X
6
XII
7
LVIII
145
LXI
147
LXIII
150
LXIV
152
LXVI
155
LXVII
158
LXVIII
159
LXIX
164

XIII
9
XIV
10
XV
12
XVI
13
XVII
15
XVIII
17
XIX
20
XXI
3-1
XXII
3-5
XXIII
3-12
XXIV
3-14
XXV
3-17
XXVI
3-23
XXVII
3-24
XXVIII
3-27
XXIX
3-30
XXX
3-32
XXXI
3-37
XXXII
3-38
XXXIV
3-40
XXXVI
3-41
XXXVII
3-44
XXXVIII
3-50
XXXIX
3-53
XL
3-58
XLI
3-59
XLIV
3-61
XLV
3-62
XLVI
3-65
XLVII
3-71
XLVIII
3-75
XLIX
3-79
L
111
LI
113
LII
116
LIV
120
LV
126
LVI
132
LVII
141
LXXI
169
LXXIII
174
LXXIV
179
LXXV
187
LXXVI
190
LXXVII
192
LXXVIII
195
LXXIX
201
LXXX
205
LXXXI
209
LXXXII
213
LXXXIII
218
LXXXV
223
LXXXVI
228
LXXXVII
231
LXXXVIII
232
LXXXIX
236
XC
242
XCI
243
XCII
248
XCIII
249
XCIV
256
XCVI
259
XCVII
265
XCVIII
267
C
268
CI
272
CII
274
CIII
278
CIV
279
CV
282
CVI
285
CVII
305
CX
337
CXII
347
CXIII
367
CXIV
387
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 2 - three separate shelves, several photographs show Aristide's brother and three sisters. The boy smiles confidently in the cap and gown of a high school graduate. The girls are displayed individually and in clusters, their eyes beaming, their

About the author (2001)

Alejandro Portes is Professor of Sociology at Princeton University and Director of the Center for Migration and Development, Woodrow Wilson School for Public Affairs. He is the coauthor of City on the Edge: The Transformation of Miami (California, 1993) and Latin Journey: Cuban and Mexican Immigrants in the United States (California, 1985). Portes is the 2010 recipient of the W.E.B. Du Bois Career of Distinguished Scholarship Award from the American Sociological Association. Rubén G. Rumbaut is Professor of Sociology at Michigan State University. He is coauthor, with Alejandro Portes, of Immigrant America: A Portrait (California, 1996), and the coeditor of Immigration Research for a New Century: Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2000) and Origins and Destinies: Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity in America(1996).

Bibliographic information