Legacy

Front Cover
Trafford Publishing, 2004 - African American families - 312 pages
0 Reviews

Legacy is about loss of inheritance and what we can do to reclaim it. The introduction summarizes the psychological tyranny inflicted on Africans and their descendants over the course of enslavement and Jim Crow. Legacy brings the past into the present with the story of Jeff Carter, a Black man born during "slavery" who, by 1916, acquired over 800 acres of mineral-rich land in the Middle District of Georgia. In this particular region, a mineral known as "chalk" to the locals, has produced a multi-billion dollar, foreign-owned and operated industry. Kaolin, as it is officially known, is predominately used in the paper and paint industries (National Geographic is about 30% kaolin), but is also used as a filler in ceramics, cosmetics, medicine, rubber, toothpaste, etc. The majority of the mineral-laden land is owned by Black farmers, who have seen very little, if any, of the profits garnered from their land. Ninety-nine (99) year mineral leases and outright theft have kept these farmers from reaping any amount of the wealth. The heirs of Jeff Carter are one such family, who were brutally evicted from their 800 acre estate in 1950. In 1980, after many failed attempts to reclaim their estate, they were solicited by kaolin-industry agents and attorneys who represented the family who stole their land!

The heirs of Jeff Carter are not unique in their story of land loss. The quantity of land that Black farmers have lost in the last one-hundred years alone is staggering. One of the most detrimental legacies of enslavement and Jim Crow is the challenge of passing an inheritance on to our children. As a result, subsequent generations have to "reinvent the wheel," because they have neither the business nor the finances to pick up where there ancestors left off.

In recent years, a settlement was to be made to the descendants of the Rosewood massacre in Florida, but each alleged descendant was required to prove their ancestry. For this reason, we encourage all people of color to research their family's genealogy. We dedicate an entire chapter to beginning this process.

Uncovering our family history is a pivotal step in healing from centuries of psychological, economic and physical rape. If for no other reason, our children should know something about the ancestors they are a legacy of.


 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Maafa African Holocaust
1
Legacy
61
The Jeff Carter Estate
62
AdministratorBond
68
The Ennis Deed
69
In The Face Of Jim Crow
71
The Probate Record
73
The Hatch to Hooks Jr Warranty Deed
75
Saruge
229
Psychiatric Oppression
232
Community Mental HealthUnder the Guise of Help
234
The Violence Initiative
235
Mind Control
237
The Effects of Psychological Warfare
240
Lets Make a Slave
248
Deep in the Mind of a Slave
254

The Scott Deed
77
The Hooks Jr to Tarbutton Deed
78
Jim Crow
80
Abuse of Power
82
Lora Ella Breaks Down
85
White Gold
87
The Struggle Continues
88
Land Loss Equals Lost Legacy
90
Black Wall Street
94
The Kaolin Cartel
151
BJ Tarbutton
156
The Industry
158
The Coup
163
Disciplinary Rules
173
NAKLo
205
Facts Not Fiction
218
OneEyed Jacks
221
Industry Agent
222
Pawns
224
Equal Protection?
228
The Debt
259
A Different Opinion
261
Proposed Remedies
265
Our Ancestry Our Inheritance
281
Developing A Family History Program
282
Documentation
283
Out Of Town Sources
284
Correspondence Record Keeping Chart
285
The Interview
288
How To Write For Official Records
289
Searching For Your Ancestry Around The World
290
African Ancestry Inc
291
The Soundex System
293
Family Associations Surname Registers Reunion Committees
297
Figuring Relationships
298
Family Questionnaire
299
References
309
BackCover
315
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information