Legislation Authorizing the Issuance of National Medals: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Historic Preservation and Coinage of the Committee on Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-fifth Congress, Second Session ... April 26, 1978

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Page 16 - Congress, an appropriate gold medal. For such purpose, the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized and directed to cause to be struck a gold medal with suitable emblems, devices, and inscriptions to be determined by the Secretary. There is hereby authorized to be appropriated the sum of $2,500 for this purpose. SEC. 2. The Secretary of the Treasury shall cause duplicates in bronze of such medal to be coined and sold, under such regulations as he may prescribe, at a price sufficient to cover the cost...
Page 17 - Treasury, with a value not to exceed $21,000 to carry out the provisions of this subsection. (b) The Secretary of the Treasury may cause duplicates in bronze of such medal to be coined and sold under such regulations as he may prescribe, at a price sufficient to cover the cost thereof, including labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, and overhead expenses, and the appropriation used for carrying out the provisions of this subsection shall be reimbursed out of the proceeds of such sale.
Page 14 - Francisco', during the Pan American Flight, December 21, 1926 to May 2, 1927, displayed initiative, resourcefulness and a high degree of skill under the many trying conditions encountered throughout the flight. His tireless energy, sound judgment and personal courage contributed materially to the successful completion of this mission of good will. In the efficient performance of his arduous duties, he aided in the accomplishment of an exploit which brought great credit to himself and to the Army...
Page 21 - The Secretary of the Treasury shall cause such medals to be struck and furnished at not less than the estimated cost of manufacture, including labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, and overhead expenses; and security satisfactory to the Director of the Mint shall be furnished to indemnify the United States for the full payment of such costs. Sec. 3. The medals authorized to be issued pursuant to this Act shall be of such size or sizes and...
Page 57 - Be it enacted by the Senate of the United States and the House of Representatives in Congress assembled, Sec.
Page 12 - S. GOLDWATER, A US SENATOR FROM THE STATE OF ARIZONA Senator GOLDWATER. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate this opportunity. I will keep it as short as I can but I have had lifelong interest in the education of our Indians. In Arizona we have 25 percent of all the tribes.
Page 65 - That dies of a national character may be executed by the engraver, and national and other medals struck by the coiner of the mint at Philadelphia, under such regulations as the superintendent, with the approval of the director of the mint, may prescribe...
Page 17 - Anderson for a period of more than a half a century during which she has been the recipient of the highest awards from a score of foreign countries, for her untiring and unselfish devotion to the promotion of the arts in this country and throughout the world including the establishment of scholarships for young people, for her strong and imaginative support to humanitarian causes at home, for her contributions to the cause of world peace through her work as United States delegate to the United Nations...
Page 61 - The present requirements for national medal status are multifold: the dies for the medals must be of a national character, which term is not further defined; they must be produced at the Philadelphia Mint; and they may be executed by the chief engraver provided that the work does not interfere with regular coinage operations. Finally, no private medal dies may be prepared at the Mint, or any machinery used for that purpose. Despite these seemingly stringent requirements, a number of laws recently...
Page 14 - Question Mark' on the refueling flight at and near Los Angeles, California, which remained in the air a total of 150 hours, 40 minutes and 15 seconds, a period of continuous flight longer than any previous flight ever accomplished. By his endurance, resourcefulness and determination, he demonstrated future possibilities in aviation which were heretofore not appreciated and thus reflected great credit upon himself and the Army of the United States.

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