Lessons in Elocution, Or, A Selection of Pieces in Prose and Verse: For the Improvement of Youth in Reading and Speaking

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E.P. Walton, 1820 - Elocution - 407 pages
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Contents

Advantages of and motives to cheerful ness Spectator
82
SECTION II
87
Respect duq to old age Spectator
88
Modesty and docility ib
89
f Sincerity ib
90
G Benevolence and humanity
91
Industry and application ib
92
Proper employment of time ib
93
On contentment Spectator
94
Needle work recommended to the Ladies ib
97
On pride Guardian
99
Journal of the life of Alexander Severus Gibbon
101
Character of Julias Cesar Middleton
102
On mispent time Guardian
103
Character of Francis I Robertson
107
The supper and grace Sterne
110
Rustic felicity ib
112
SECTION III
115
3 Character of Addison as a writer Johnson
116
Pleasure and pain Spectator
117
Sir Roger de Coverlys family ib
118
Tiie folly of inconsistent expectations Aitkin
121
Description of the vale of Keswick in Cumberland Brown
124
Pity an allegory Aitkin
127
Advantages of commerce Spectator 128
128
On public speaking ib
130
Advantages of history Hume
132
On the immortality of the soul Spectator
134
The combat of the Horatii and
136
The journey of a day a picture
143
The character of Mary queen
150
Importance of virtue Price
157
The monk Sterne 163
163
Uncle Tobys benevolence Sterne
171
On the structure of animals Spectator
177
The folly and madness of ambition
184
Character of king Alfred Hume 193
193
The cant of criticism 12 Parallel between Pope and Dryden
201
Story of Le Fever SECTION VI
202
The shepherd and the philosopher Gay
211
Ode to Leaven Water Smollet
213
Rural charms Goldsmith
214
The painter who pleased nobody and every body Gay
215
Detription of a country ale bouse Goldsmith
235
Character of a country schoolmaster ib
236
Story of Palemon and Lavinia Thomson
237
Celadon and Amelia ib
240
Description of Mab queen of the fairies Shakespeare
241
On the existence of a Deity Young
242
Evening in paradise described 1 Milton
243
10 Elegy written in a country churchyard Gray
245
Scipio restoring the captive lady to her lover Thomson
248
Humorous complaint to Dr Arbuthnot of the impertinence of scribblers Pope
250
1JS Hymn to adversity Gray
251
The passions An ode Collins
252
LESSONS IN SPEAKING
278
On happiness Sterne
284
SECTION II
292
SECTION III
301
SPEECHES ON VARIOUS SUBJECTS
310
Publius Scipio to the Roman army ib
316
Canuleiiis to the Roman consub Hooke
324
Jupiter to the inferiour deities Homer
333
SECTION V
340
Priuli and Jaffier Venice Preserved 346
348
Cardinal Wolsey and Cromwell Henry VIIL
354
Brutus and Cassius Shakespeares Julius Cesar
361
Douglasaccount of the hermit Trag of Douglas
366
Sempronius speech for war Tragedy of Cato
367
Hotspurs account of the fop 1 Henry IV
368
soliloquy on the contents of a letter ib
369
Othellos apology for his marriage Tragedy of Othello
370
Henry IVs soliloquy on sleep 2 Henry IV
371
Bobadils method of defeating an array y Every man in his humour
372
Soliloquy of Hamlet on death ib 873
374
Prologue to the Tragedy of Cato Pope 876
375
Catos soliloquy on the immortality of the soul Tragedy of Cato
376
Speech of Henry V at the siege of Harfleur Shakespeares Henry V 877
377
before the battle of Agincourt ib
378
Soliloquy of Dick the apprentice Farce the Apprentice
379
Cassius instigating Brutus to join the conspiracy against Cesar Tragedy of Julius Cesar 880
380
Brutus harrangue on the death of Cesar ib 881
381
Antonys oration over Cesars body ib 882
382
Falstaffs soliloquy on honour Henry IV 884
384
Part of Richard Illds soliloquy the night pro ceeding the Battle of Bosworth Tragedy of Richard Hid
385
APPENDIXcontaining concise lessons on a new plan
387

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Page 258 - Seasons return—but not to me returns Day, or the sweet approach of even or morn, Or sight of vernal bloom, or summer's rose, Or flocks or herds, or human face divine; But cloud instead, and ever during dark' Surround me, from the cheerful ways of men Cut off, and for the
Page 354 - a long farewell to all my greatness! This is the state of man ; to day he puts forth. The tender leaves of hope \ tomorrow blossoms, And bears his blushing honours thick upon him 5 The third day conies a frost, a killing frost, And when he thinks, good easy man, full
Page 365 - Pray you avoid it. Be not too tame, neither; but let your own discretion be your tutor. Suit the action to the word, the word to the action! with this special observance, that you o'er step not the modesty of nature ; for any thing so overdone is from the purpose of
Page 384 - 1 I am no orator, as Brutus is ; But, as you know me all, a plain, blunt man, That love my friend—and that they know full well, That gave me public leave to speak of him .' For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's
Page 407 - means, warmed and cooled by the same summer and winter, as a Christian is ? •If you prick us, do we not bleed ? If you tickle us, do we not laugh ? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we
Page 376 - untried being, Through what new scenes and changes must we pass ! The wide, th' unbounded prospect lies before me ; But shadows, clouds and darkness rest upon it. Here will I hold. If there's a Power above us, (And that there is, all nature cries aloud Through all her works) be mus,t delight in virtue; And
Page 236 - mansion, skill'd to rule, The village master taught his little school. A man severe he was, and stern to view; I knew him well, and every truant knew. , Well had the boding tremblers learn'd to trace • * The day's disasters in his morning face: 'Full well they laugh'd, and counterfeited glee, At all
Page 250 - him for her own. Large was his bounty, and his soul sincere; Heaven did a recompense as largely send. He gave to mis'ry all he had—a tear; He gain'd from heaven ('twas all he wish'd)— a friend. . . No farther seek his merits to disclose, Or draw his frailties
Page 390 - not enough no harshness gives ofience ; The sound must seem an echo to the sense. Soft is the strain when zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows ; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse rough verse should like the torrent roar. When Ajax strives some reek's vast weight to
Page 250 - Grav'd on the stone beneath yon aged thorn. THE EPITAPH. HERE rests his head upon the lap of earth, A youth to fortune and to fame unknown : Fair Science frown'd not on his humble birth, And Melancholy rnark'd him for her own. Large was his bounty, and his soul sincere; Heaven did a recompense as largely send.

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